Interview April – Jill Goodpasture

It’s time for our next guest, the delightful Jill Goodpasture!

JillGoodpasture

Introduce yourself and tell us a bit about you…

My name is Jill Goodpasture aka Fibroscoop. I have been writing my blog The Scoop on Fibromyalgia and Chronic Illnesses for a year now. I am a divorced mom of 2 teenage boys, 15 and 19. My oldest just left home so things have just changed around the house recently. I also have 3 furbabies and Sophie my support dog is frequently featured on the blog. She is just too stinking cute not to get on there occasionally.

Chronic illness(es)/disabilities I have…

I have Fibromyalgia, Early Degenerative Arthritis in my lower back and hips, Plantar Fasciitis, Narcolepsy, Sleep Apnea, Depression, and Anxiety.

My symptoms/condition began/My diagnosis process was…

In the spring of 2016, I started to have trouble with plantar fasciitis for a second time. I went back to the podiatrist who treated it the first time with cortisone shots. This time the shots didn’t work though. In fact, I had a inflammatory reaction to the shots and can no longer take steroids. I started seeing an Orthopedic Foot Doctor who put me in a boot for 6 months. During that time my back and hip started hurting. When the boot went away, the pain in my back and hip just got worse. When it persisted. I went to the orthopedic for my back and they said I had arthritis in my back and hips.  This was Oct 2016. In about August of that fall I had begun having body aches and nerve pain in my legs. This progressed to numbness and weakness.

The Doctors did nerve tests and MRI’s and finally said there was nothing wrong and sent me to PT. Well it so happens that I had the best PT in the world. She told me that it really sounded like I had something Autoimmune going on with my body. She knew my GP and told me to go talk to him. I did and he said he thought I had Fibromyalgia and maybe MS or RA. He did a thousand blood tests and when everything came back negative he sent me to a Rheumatologist and recommended that my Neurologist do a brain MRI. The Rheumatologist diagnosed early degenerative arthritis in my lower back and hips and fibromyalgia. She ran a bunch of tests that were negative and said we would keep our eyes on and keep checking for muscle conditions based on symptoms. My Neurologist did a brain MRI and there was no sign of MS but we recheck every 6 months.

I have struggled with depression and anxiety since middle school. I have seen a therapist and been on medication for about 20 years now. I like to think I have it pretty much “under control” but anyone with depression knows that is a myth. My therapist and I have a close working relationship and do phone visits weekly, and anytime I feel overwhelmed or that the pain is too much to handle I text her and we schedule extra visits as needed.

The hardest part of living with my illness/disabilities is…

This is a tough one. I would have to say it is a toss up between seeing how it has affected my kids to the loss of the future I had all planned dreamed of for so long.

A typical day for me involves…

I generally wake up early, between 5 and 7. My son gets himself up for school so on the off chance I am able to sleep in, I can do so. When I first wake I lay in the bed and do a few stretches so that when I move to get up it won’t hurt so bad. Then I take my cpap off and put the hoses in the drawer and get up. I stand there and do a few more stretches. I make my bed up and set up a bunch of pillows to recline against and turn on my heating pads to warm up. I let the dogs out. Then I use the restroom and put my medicine bin on the bed so I won’t forget it. I make breakfast, coffee, and a big cup of Diet Dr. Pepper (my lifeblood). When everything is ready I go back to the bedroom and let the dogs in. I filled their bowls while I was in the kitchen.

I make myself comfy on the bed, turn on the morning show and eat my breakfast. Then I take my meds and supplements and do my journaling for the day. I might spend a few hours journaling if I don’t have anywhere to go. If I am going somewhere then as soon as the stiffness leaves my body I will get in the shower so I can sit on the bed for a while after to recover before the appointment. I always schedule appointments with this in mind. After the appointment or a few hours of journaling, around noon or one I will eat lunch if hungry and take a nap. This could be anywhere from one to four hours. When the kiddo gets home from soccer, thankfully transported by friends, we reheat leftovers, eat frozen dinners or he cooks usually. Then he usually does homework and talks to friends and showers til bed. I text with friends and sometimes journal or watch tv or something.

The one thing I cannot live without is…

My phone, it is my connection to the world outside my bedroom. My heating pads for pain control. I can’t decide between them.

Being ill/disabled has taught me…

Well, I think that my illness is trying to teach me patience and the ability to sit and relax, but I have not quite learned the lessons yet. I hate being in the bed all day doing nothing. I get impatient in SO many ways. I am a work in progress.

What advice would I give someone recently diagnosed…

RESEARCH and FIGHT. Research your disease and not just in the medical journals. Go to the blogs and the internet and read what people who have your condition have. Talk to people. You would be shocked once you start telling people how many people you know will have the same condition. Once you are armed with information then you fight. You fight with the doctors and the insurance companies and make sure you get the diagnoses, treatments, and medicines you need to get better.

My support system is…

My mother, my two kids, my friend Lori, and my ex-husband all provide supports in different ways. My best friend Traci has been there more times than I can count. My biggest support is my therapist who has went above and beyond making herself available by phone 24/7 to help when I am in pain or depressed or having major anxiety or whatever I need.

If I had one day symptom/disability-free I would…

Be on the go from sun up to sun down. I would do something fun with my boys. I would go kayaking with my best friend. Go out to eat anywhere I want. Go see a movie. Just go, go, go. Like before I got sick.

One positive of having a chronic illness/disability is…

Hmmm…. This question is a tough one for me. I honestly cannot come up with a positive at this point. Maybe I will one day but right now in this journey I cannot.

My social media links are:

Blog:

https://scooponfibro.wordpress.com/

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/fibroscoop1/

Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/fibroscoop/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/Fibroscoop

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13 thoughts on “Interview April – Jill Goodpasture

  1. Lovely to see you featured here, Jill! Phone vs heatpad.. maybe one day they’ll integrate the two. I think you’re advice, for research and fight, is exactly spot on. Arm yourself, advocate for yourself, and never give up!
    Caz xx

  2. Hello Jill: Your story is very moving. I do not have to deal with these kind of issues so I can only imagine the challenges you face day-to-day. Your advice about research and fighting are important for everyone of us today. We must all be our own advocates in our health care. Thank you for the important reminder!

    • Thank you for your comments. You are so right. The research and advocate advice can apply to all healthcare decisions or to parenting decisions or work or legal. I could go on but I think you get the drift. Thank you for pointing that out!

  3. A comment that came to me via the website on this interview:

    What a powerful testimony of strength. I am so blown away by your positive attitude.
    God Bless You!!

    Carrie

  4. Great to find out more about you here Jill. Sounds like you have an amazing therapist and lovely family support. That makes me happy for you.

    • I am so sorry! It JUST now occurred to me to check for comments on this interview. Duh! Thank you for reading Lee. I do love my therapist dearly!! You are very kind.

Your Comments Are Welcome!