Let’s Learn About CBD and Cannabis

Today, I’m featuring a guest post by author Bojana Petkovic, Project Manager at Loud Cloud Health

CBD and Cannabis: How They Benefit Our Health and Society 

The good news is that millions of researchers in the field of medicine, pharmacology, and biochemistry put a lot of effort into exploring cannabis and its main cannabinoids. Thanks to research, cannabis and its incredible benefits are quickly gaining momentum. Let’s take a look at some basic facts and stats.

What Makes Cannabis Worth Researching?

Humankind has been familiar with this plant for at least 5,000 years. Throughout history, many people have consumed it as medicine through food and beverages. Some of the most acknowledged effects of cannabis include killing all sorts of pain, helping cancer patients, improving mental health, etc. That is why a growing number of the world’s governments consider decriminalizing or fully legalizing it. 

The plant has an incredible number of complex substances in its buds, fan leaves, and stems. Those substances are called cannabinoids. There are ten most significant ones recognized by modern medicine, two of them being CBD (cannabidiol) and THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). 

Even though the research has been fruitful, scientists believe there is still a lot more to know about cannabis’s benevolent nature. 

What Do We Know About CBD and Cannabis?

First and foremost, we are aware that CBD successfully relieves symptoms such as chronic pain, cramps, and tissue inflammation. Such symptoms are common in diseases like arthritis, fibromyalgia, rheumatism, and numerous other musculoskeletal conditions that typically trouble the senior population. According to the study conducted at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, CBD tends to reduce arthritic and back pain, leaving trauma-related pain behind as well.

Types of Pain - Chronic Pain

Mental disorders and illnesses are common for all age groups. The typical symptoms include anxiety, mood swings, dementia, and insomnia. Less common ones include severe psychosis.  

CBD appears remarkably advantageous in this field of medicine. Research by Bonn-Miller suggests the importance of medicinal cannabis to those who have PTSD by helping them sleep and cope with trauma. Another study from 2006 explains that as much as cannabis might instigate a more regular use, depression and psychotic disorders should be treated with it. Less agitation, more sleep, and success in battling constant anxiety are just some reasons why cannabis should be used in different treatments. 

In adults, CBD and cannabis can help cure more severe addictions. Such addictions include heavy opioids, alcohol, and of course, prescription drugs. That may seem paradoxical since cannabis needs to be used in moderation as some forms can cause dependence. Addiction statistics reveal that adequate use of cannabis helped 26% of people who consumed heroin to opt out of it and smoke marijuana instead. Some 40% of alcohol addicts chose to do so as well. Additionally, 66% of prescription drug addicts switched to cannabis for good. 

Word of Warning

Though cannabis sounds like a miracle plant, that doesn’t mean it has no side effects. THC is mainly known for being psychoactive, while CBD can induce nausea, dizziness, or dry mouth. Most of these occur if one consumes too much. Cannabis use disorder is a form of dependence, so it is of ultimate importance to use the plant responsibly, and always consult a doctor if you have a condition.

What Can We Anticipate in the Future?

Thanks to technological advancement, we are about to see the new and incredible benefits of this plant. We should not fail to mention that, through further legalization and decriminalization, a large number of people will have job opportunities within cannabusiness. This industry has no intention to leave its upward trajectory. Au contraire, it will most probably be “the next big thing.”

Infographic URL: https://loudcloudhealth.com/pros-and-cons-of-weed-infographic/

Thanks for reading and remember:

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Common Questions About Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a complex condition that affects millions of people around the world. There are many questions that people ask when they first find out they have Fibro, and I thought I’d answer some of the more common ones, to help provide some education.

What Are The First Signs Of Fibromyalgia

There are many signs of Fibro but the ones most people experience first is widespread pain and tenderness throughout the body. You may experience pain in only one or two areas, or it may be your entire body. Typically, there are tenderpoints at 18 specific sites on your body, and these are used to help determine if you have Fibro.

Other symptoms of Fibro include:


What Are Tender Points?

Tender points refer to 18 locations on the body that are ultra-sensitive to pain when touched or pressed. Fibro is frequently diagnosed using the Tender Point Test…if you have 11 of the 18 points, you are considered to have Fibro.

Is Fibromyalgia An Autoimmune Disease?

Fibromyalgia is NOT considered an autoimmune disease. Instead, researchers believe that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting the way your brain processes pain signals.

Fibromyalgia doesn’t qualify as an autoimmune disorder because it doesn’t cause inflammation. Fibromyalgia is difficult to diagnose because its symptoms are similar or associated with other conditions, including some autoimmune disorders.

In many cases, fibromyalgia can occur simultaneously with autoimmune disorders.

How Does A Person Get Fibromyalgia?

Healthprep.com offers this information on how a person gets Fibro.

Emotional or physical trauma can cause the development of fibromyalgia and trigger symptom flare-ups. The mechanism behind this is associated with the affected individual’s hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Emotional stressors can cause the physiological stress response to become activated, and lead to the delivery of sensory input information to the brain.

Repeated and excessive stimulation of the functional units of this response in an individual can cause their effector systems to become more sensitive. Greater sensitivity causes alternative or less significant stressors to activate the stress response easily.

The combination of the stress response, emotional reactions, physiological responses, and biological reactions that occur and interact with each other due to physical and emotional trauma can cause the development of fibromyalgia.

Of the population of fibromyalgia patients, around half has existing post-traumatic stress disorder, and two-thirds of these individuals had developed fibromyalgia after the commencement of their PTSD. Some individuals may be at an increased risk of developing fibromyalgia due to the failure of certain psychological buffers to work effectively on emotional stress that is caused by everyday life events.

Physical trauma contributes because it causes emotional stress. These mechanisms related to the patient’s brain may primarily drive the chain of neurophysiological responses known to cause fibromyalgia.

Is Fibromyalgia Real or Fake?

Doctors and patients alike state that fibromyalgia is a very real condition. Pain is often subjective and can be difficult to measure. Because there are no lab tests that can show Fibromyalgia, people assume that it is fake. As a result, the most common misconception about fibromyalgia is that it isn’t a real condition.

In both Canada and the United States, fibromyalgia is now considered a condition that qualifies for Disability. The European Parliament has signed a declaration calling for the recognition of fibromyalgia as a disease which causes disability with a right to claim exemption.

What Are The Best Medications For Fibromyalgia?

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like naproxen (Aleve) and ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) don’t appear to work for fibromyalgia pain. Opioid narcotics are powerful pain-relieving medications that work for some types of pain, but they don’t always work for fibromyalgia. They can also be harmful—and addictive.

The narcotic-like Tramadol (Ultram) has been shown to have some effectiveness with Fibromyalgia for pain relief. Low-dose amitriptyline can also be helpful. Tizanidine and cyclobenzaprine are muscle relaxants that help treat muscle pain from fibromyalgia.

There are three medications that have been approved for use for fibromyalgia. These medications include Cymbalta (duloxetine), Savella (milnacipran) and Lyrica (pregabalin).

Each of them works in the brain: Cymbalta and Savella belong to a class of medications called serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) whereas Lyrica is a drug that targets nerve signals. It has long been used to relieve nerve pain in patients with shingles and diabetic neuropathy. It is also used to treat partial seizures.

For other treatments, this post offers several suggestions for ways to help with Fibro pain. Another option is to try Cannabis or CBD Oil.

How Life Changing Is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia can affect you in both mild and severe forms. You may find that with medication, you are able to continue to work and engage in other activities without discomfort. Other people find that even with medications, they are in too much pain to maintain their previous lifestyles.

Disability may need to be sought if you are unable to continue working because of your Fibro. You may need to modifiy activities, use mobility aids or adaptive devices or otherwise change your lifestyle to accomodate your pain and fatigue. Every individual will feel their Fibro differently and you may find that your condition changes constantly as well.

What Helps Fibromyalgia?

Good Nutrition Month

Rest, good nutrition, mild exercise and a positive frame of mind all go a long way in helping to live with Fibromyalgia. Lack of movement is one of the biggest mistakes you can make if you have Fibro. It causes your muscles to tighten even more, so exercise such as walking, biking or swimming can be helpful in keeping you flexible and having less pain.

A diet rich in fruits and vegetables, lean protein and good carbohydrates is essential. If you are overweight, you might want to try losing some extra pounds to help with joint pain.

Getting the proper amount of sleep can be very difficult with Fibromyalgia. Follow a sleep plan at night to get your best rest possible and nap if you need to during the day in moderation. A well-rested body is better able to function fully.

Finally, try to maintain a positive perspective. If you find yourself struggling with negative thoughts, it may be helpful to seek counselling or coaching. Support groups either in-person or online can also be very helpful.

Conclusion

Fibromyalgia can be a very difficult condition to diagnose and treat, but as you can see, there are things you can do that make a difference. The more you can educate yourself, the better your outcomes can be. Remember,

There Is Always Hope

Cannabis for Fibromyalgia and Invisible Illness (And Ways To Use It)

There has been much talk about the use of Cannabis for treating Fibromyalgia and other Invisible Illnesses. I recently featured John Martinez from Axon who wrote about using CBD Oil for treating migraine headaches. Today I want to share various ways you can use CBD Oils to obtain optimum health. 

While there are many cannabinoids in the plant, THC and CBD are the ones “in charge” for fighting pain and inflammation. What about Hemp? Hemp has some very mild “anti-pain” properties, its use is best suited in other applications. This article by Cannadish gives an excellent breakdown of all three components. 

So how do you use Cannabis to help with a medical condition like Fibromyalgia or MS or arthritis? 

As an example, a Cannabis-infused Topical lotion can be applied to the skin on the areas affected by your health condition, but having a bath is a great solution to have your whole body relax with cannabis oil. It’s especially great before going to bed. One easy way to do this is by making cannabis-infused bath bombs.

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The Process

 

INGREDIENTS

100mg CBD from the dealer of your choice*

1 tablespoon olive oil or coconut oil.

1 cup baking soda

1/2 cup Citric Acid (can be purchased at any soap making store)

1/2 cup Epsom Salt

1/2 cup corn starch

1 teaspoon water Food colouring of your choice

Your choice of essentials oils 30-40 drops

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Place the dry ingredients in a large bowl and mix together with a whisk.
  2. In a small bowl, mix the liquid ingredients together, including the CBD oil until well blended.
  3. In the large bowl, very slowly add the liquid mixture to the dry ingredients a little bit at a time. The mixture should hold together when squeezed without crumbling.
  4. When well mixed, pack the mixture into your bath bomb mould and pack tightly, then let it dry. Make sure you work quickly so the mixture doesn’t dry out in the process.
  5. Bath Bombs need a full day to fully harden. If they’re not quite hardened enough, they may crumble when you handle them, so check to make sure before taking them completely out of the mould
  6. Makes one good size bath bomb, or several smaller if you are using smaller moulds

*Note: Depending on the strength of the CBD oil you have, the volume (drops or ml) of oil needed for this recipe will vary. For instance, an oil containing 1mg CBD per drop will require 100 drops. Having trouble calculating? Try this CBD oil calculator

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To use your new bath bomb, simply add to a tub of warm, almost hot water and relax for 20 minutes (min). 

Other Forms Of Use

The Patch

Cannabis can be used in other forms as well. Some companies have been selling a Patch. Like the patch used for the diabetic nerve pain treatment, it provides the patient with a controlled release of the medication:

  • Through a porous membrane covering a reservoir of medication.
  • Body heat melting thin layers of medication embedded in the adhesive which will contain high potency cannabinoid (CBD) extract. This extract slowly enters the bloodstream and then penetrates the central nervous system of the patient thus delivering the pain relief sought.

Edibles

This excellent article talks about Cannabis Edibles and the many ways you can enjoy the benefits of this particular form of consumption.  Instructions are given as to dosage, benefits, side effects and more, and it also contains a bit of history as to how edibles came to be so popular. 

The author and I share very similar views that all these forms of ingesting Cannabis are beneficial to those who suffer from Fibromyalgia, MS, Lupus, Arthritis, and more. 

I recommend finding a store near you where you can begin a relationship with the staff to get all your questions answered. Many US States are now allowed to sell legally and Cannabis is legal in Canada as well. 

Get to know the staff, let them show you their favourite products and ways to use Cannabis, and before you know it, you’ll hopefully be finding the relief you’ve been seeking. No, Cannabis doesn’t work for everyone (in fact, I’ve tried it myself and am one of the people that it does nothing for!). Don’t get discouraged right away…try other forms such as the bath bomb if an edible didn’t work for you, or vice versa. 

Cannabis is NOT a miracle cure, but when it works, it can really bring relief to an overwhelmed body. I hope you find this to be true in your case. Remember…

There is always hope

Using CBD Oil In The Bath