Why I Blog (About Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Invisible Illness)

I have been blogging for a couple of years now and recently someone asked me “why do you blog? What do you get out of it?”

It was a good question, so I thought I’d write a post about my reasons for blogging and what I hope to achieve with this blog site

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Image by TeroVesalainen from Pixabay

Education

When I first started to blog, I wrote about my total hip replacement because I’d had problems trying to find first-person accounts of undergoing that particular type of surgery, especially for someone who was in their 50’s. Hip replacements seem to be done on mostly older folks (in their 70’s or older) but rarely on the younger set, unless you’ve been born with a hip problem or have suffered a devastating injury. 

Because I was only 54 when I had my hip replacement done, I was considered “unusual” by my surgeon (and yes, I’m sure he meant my hip only and not me in general!) so trying to find others in the same position was difficult. I had read enough websites to understand the technical side of the surgery, but I wanted to find out what it was like to actually have the surgery and then recuperate and go on with life. 

Since I was unable to find a lot of good information, I decided to write about my own experiences, so others in my position might be able to find what I was looking for. Once I’d written about that, it seemed natural to go on and talk about other health issues I live with and how they impact my life. From there, the blog site grew organically and became what it is now – a place for articles and posts about Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain, Chronic Fatigue and Invisible Illnesses, such as Lupus, MS, Arthritis, POTs, Ehler’s Danlos Syndrome and more. 

The goal has been achieved and I’m proud of what I’ve been able to create with this site. I hope others feel the same. 

Compassion

Living with a Chronic Illness is hard work. People with Chronic Pain and Invisible Illness are often left feeling isolated, and when you find someone online who speaks your language, it can be like finding an oasis in the desert. 

In addition to educating people, I wanted this blog site to be a place where comments could be left freely, allowing people the opportunity to share what’s going on in their lives in a safe way. When readers have identified with a particular post, their comments reflect their own lives and situations and I take that seriously. I often respond back, not always in the comment section, but in-person to what they’ve said.

My responsibility as a writer is to ensure that not only am I educating people but I’m giving them some hope as well. Life with Chronic Illness is painful physically and mentally and when you find a spot online that reflects your own thoughts and ideas and connects with you, there’s a genuine freeing sensation. You feel less alone in the world and you realize that other people “get it”. Being understood is an amazing feeling and us Chronic Pain Warriors don’t always feel understood. 

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Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Volunteering

In many ways, I see writing this blog as another form of volunteering that I do. My focus on health and wellbeing extends beyond this blog site, but I consider the site to be one of service to others. 

Like my other volunteer roles, I receive no compensation for producing this site, with the exception of any money I might make with Affiliate Marketing (more about that in a minute). I do this purely because I want to help others who are in Chronic Pain and who feel lost and alone and in need of information that might help make their lives better. 

My other volunteer roles include committee work for Surgical Quality Improvement, improving Clinical Resources for Patients such as updating Patient Information Sheets received when you are discharged from an ER and Laboratory Quality Control to ensure that Patients are receiving the best care possible when they are providing lab samples for doctor-ordered tests. I also sit on a Provincial Measurement Working Group that is creating a survey for Patients in British Columbia, Canada to ensure that their care received has been the best it can be. 

These roles, together with this blog, give me ample ways to help others, and that brings a lot of happiness to my soul. 

 

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Image by John Hain from Pixabay

Helping Myself

My final reason for blogging is purely selfish…I do this for me as well. It’s therapeutic to be able to write about what’s new in health care, or what I’ve been thinking about a certain subject. I love being able to tackle controversial subjects or bring emotional issues to light, such as intimacy when you are Chronically Ill. 

I consider myself lucky to be in a position where I can have some influence over others and perhaps introduce them to a treatment they haven’t heard of before. There’s nothing quite as satisfying as hearing back from someone who says “you changed my life” or “I really needed to read this”. It makes up for the research, the typing on days when my hands hurt and the work of coming up with new topics that will be of interest.

If you are a blogger, you understand what I’m talking about. If you are a reader, just let me say that having responsibility for you and what I’m producing for you is an honour I don’t take lightly. I want to make sure you’re getting information that benefits you and your health because I know what it’s like to live with Chronic Illness and I know the types of things that I’d like to read and learn from. 

Thank you for allowing me to share these thoughts with you. I appreciate your comments below, or you can always write to me using the Contact Form. 

I do this because I love it. I love sharing and helping others and I hope I’m able to continue for a long time to come. Remember…

There Is Always Hope

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Interview October – Beth

Interview October continues with another wonderful guest…let’s meet Beth Crutcher

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Introduce yourself and tell us a bit about you…  

My name is Beth…I am a 52 yo, Married, mother of 2, Full time Registered Dental Assistant. I’ve been in the same dental office since 1995.

Chronic illness(es)/disabilities I have… 

I have Chronic Congestive Heart Failure, My Ejection Fraction, or how the blood pumps through the heart currently sits at 35- 40%, normal is 55-70%. I also have been diagnosed with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and Mixed Connective Tissue Disorder.

My symptoms/condition began… 

My symptoms first began with the birth of my first child in 1988, I was 21 years old and had an uneventful pregnancy, but soon after the birth of my daughter I noticed I could not take in a deep breath, and felt a heaviness on my chest. Since I had just had an emergency c-section, doctors overlooked any concerns as normal pregnancy symptoms. When I persisted they finally saw me and realized I was in distress as my oxygen levels were in the 70’s. I was sent to the ER and treated for pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, asthma, and even anxiety. I was away from my newborn for two weeks and discharged without a proper diagnosis. That of which I would not get until the birth of my second daughter 13 years later in 2001 and in post-pregnancy had shortness of breath, and swelling, and could not lie flat. after two weeks of medical professionals saying it was normal..an ER Cardiologist gave me a diagnosis of PeriPartum Cardiomyopathy. Pregnancy-induced heart failure,

My Ejection Fraction was at 10%  and I may get better with medications, or I may need a heart transplant.  I have been on an up and down EF rollercoaster of treatments and medications and am currently stable with an EF of 35-40%.  Still very symptomatic and having other symptoms of  extreme fatigue, lightheadedness, brain fog,  excessive heart palpitations, exercise intolerance, nausea, severe headaches, aura migraines, joint pain , stomach pain, sun/heat exposure intolerance, dizziness, high and low blood pressure readings led to having a positive tilt table test and a diagnosis of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), an autonomic dysfunction, Dysautonomia. and blood work revealed a high ANA reading which gave me a diagnosis of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease, an autoimmune disorder.  All aspects of each illness has its challenges and it is often hard to balance one against the other.

The hardest part of living with my illness/disabilities is… 

An unpleasant aspect of HF and POTS and MCTD, for me, is doing a task that involves squatting down (rather than bending from the waist, which makes me feel faint on standing upright). Getting something from the bottom of the shelf, or reaching and stretching in a continuous motion, walking up a flight of stairs, as well as taking the elevator leaves me very short of breath, or dizzy. I ask why this happens and they said it’s a bit like standing on a garden hose – squatting down like that with an inefficient heart restricts the return of blood to the right side of the heart through the vena cava, consequently there is less to go to the lungs for oxygen before being pumped around the body by the dysfunctional left side of the heart. I also don’t like the pain in my joints, it can make the smallest of tasks unbearable.

A typical day for me involves… 

First getting out of bed in the morning is slow moving.  I have learned to move carefully. I only have so much energy to use in a day. Monday-Friday I work full time in a busy dental office. I have learned my limits and go through life accordingly. When I’m in a flare-up, I rest. I do activities/ family functions when I feel up to it, when I feel I can’t… I don’t.

The one thing I cannot live without is… 

My Husband and children and soon to be granddaughter!

Being ill/disabled has taught me… 

You know who your real friends are. The ones that understand you may not be capable of doing what you once did, but support you when you can or can’t.

What advice would I give someone recently diagnosed… 

Trust yourself. Keep telling yourself, You’re not unreliable, Your health is. It’s not your fault

My support system is…

My family and friends and work family. And social media groups.

If I had one day symptom/disability-free I would… 

I would with all my loved ones around me, run down the beach, climb a mountain to look at the view down below. And just take in the sunshine and eat whatever I want!!!

One positive of having a chronic illness/disability is…

The connections I have made through social media and becoming an advocate for PPCM with SavetheMommies.com. My Heartsisters are like my family.

My links are:

SavetheMommies.com