Interview October – Roger

Let’s meet Roger Potter, our next guest on Interview October. Here he is:

Rog Potter

Introduce yourself and tell us a bit about you…  

My name is Roger Potter, a young strong Senior who is one of the original blue babies of the 1940’s, born also with congenital heart disease and one of the pioneering babies that had open heart surgery in 1952. I am also one of 20 co-authors of a up coming book called Cardiac Athletes vol 2.

Chronic illness(es)/disabilities I have… 

I was born a Blue Baby – this means that you’re born with a pale bluish color to your skin which means that you are still mixing oxygen and blood when you’re not supposed to be which indicates you also have congenital heart disease.

My symptoms/condition began… 

My symptoms began at birth and the diagnosis was at 6 months of age.

The hardest part of living with my illness/disabilities is… 

The hardest part as a child was not being able to keep up with the other kids and getting tired very fast.  Now as an adult, it’s accepting the fact that there are things I can’t do or doing them differently.

A typical day for me involves… 

Being active, living as full a life as I can and getting in the gym on a regular basis, for this condition is not going to stop me – I will capitalize on it.

One thing I can’t live without is…

The one thing I can’t live without is activity and going to the gym for this malady will not defeat me.

Being ill/disabled has taught me… 

Feeling or being disabled has taught me how to live boldly and be able to conquer that which I can and let others do that which I can’t.

What advice would I give someone recently diagnosed… 

I would tell those that are recently diagnosed to find out all that you can about what you have and talk with your Doctor at great lengths about exactly what you have then find out what your restrictions are like I did – and then find out if there is a way that you can accomplish at least some of your goals safely.

My support system is…

My support system is in part myself, for I seek to challenge myself on a safe basis and with Facebook Cardiac Athletes when I can motivate those that are going through problems that I had many years ago.

If I had one day symptom/disability-free I would… 

If I had one day free of all and knew that it wouldn’t bother me, I would max the day out. One positive of having a disability is knowing you’re a survivor and in an exclusive club and being able to do things that you weren’t supposed to be able to do.

My links are:

http://www.openheartsurgerytoseniorstrength.com/

https://twitter.com/SeniorPower

Interview October – Derek

We continue our Interview October series with a guest I think you’ll enjoy. Let’s meet Derek Canas

DerekCanas

Introduce yourself and tell us a bit about you…  

My name is Derek most people call me D-REK I’ll explain that later. I’m 33 years old, and survivor of a congenital heart defect and open heart surgery. At sixteen years of age, I was diagnosed with Aids.

Chronic illness(es)/disabilities I have… 

Congenital Heart Defect called Transposition of the Great Arteries/ HIV/Aids

My symptoms/condition began… 

Symptoms of heart condition diagnosed at 3 months of age. Open heart surgery to correct it happened right after in 1985. I required 15 blood transfusions during surgery and recovery. During surgery, the SA node was damaged requiring a pacemaker to correct. After a 3 month recovery, I made it home but life began to show another hidden monster. I wasn’t growing at a normal rate.

My diagnosis process was… 

Heart was at 3 months HIV/Aids wasn’t discovered until the age of 16.

The hardest part of living with my illness/disabilities is… 

The Stigma surrounding HIV/Aids It makes relationships and friendships very difficult.

A typical day for me involves… 

Spending the day taking care of my two dogs and doing online advocacy from my website

The one thing I cannot live without is… 

Music I’m a DJ that’s were the D-REK name came from. So music has helped me through difficult times and made some great memories working in nightclubs

Being ill/disabled has taught me… 

I’m so much stronger than I ever could have imagined. I’ve been underestimated most of my life but I’ve always fought through whatever has tried to stop me.

What advice would I give someone recently diagnosed… 

Keep your head up things do get better. Don’t let the words in your medical records consume you. You can still chase your dreams and live a very full life.

My support system is…

Family they are great always keeping me laughing and having fun. I’ve been in some very scary situations over the years and we always found a way to find the funny moments.

If I had one day symptom/disability-free I would… 

Probably run wild. Life has tried to slow me down for a reason. I like work and if I could I’d go nonstop

One positive of having a chronic illness/disability is…

You learn the value of your health and how quickly it can fade away. You set boundaries and spend more time with those you truly care about. Little moments become something very valuable

My links are:

https://www.facebook.com/EndTheStigma912
https://twitter.com/DJDREK84
https://www.instagram.com/dreksangelsandwarriors/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCS8Ucb4xH9hJMwhngUOFaDg