Interview October – Aleisha Crabb

It’s time to introduce my next guest, the vibrant Miss Aleisha Crabb. I’m delighted to share her story here!

Introduce yourself and tell us a bit about you…

My name is Aleisha & I live in Canberra, Australia. I was born in a country town in New South Wales called Dubbo & my parents moved to Canberra when I was 1 year old.

I am a Nurse, and I work in Drug & Alcohol. My work has given me an amazing insight into human nature, and the complexities surrounding chronic pain, opioid use & addictions. I absolutely love my job & cannot imagine working anywhere better considering my own life experience of chronic pain.

One fascinating fact about me is:

I have a ridiculous good memory for movie/TV show quotes. I remember the most bizarrely un-memorable lines from movies & shows, haha. 

Chronic illness(es)/disabilities I have…

  • Psoriatic Arthritis (with associated Enthesitis & Bursitis)
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
  • Idiopathic Intercranial Hypertension
  • Trigeminal Neuralgia
  • Generalised Anxiety Disorder

My symptoms/condition began…

I injured my knee in my first year of nursing. That injury seems to have been the catalyst for triggering the onslaught of my Psoriatic Arthritis.

My diagnosis process was…

Tedious. The GP I was seeing when I first injured my knee was what I now know to be quite lazy, and was very disinterested in holistic care.

It took a very long time for him to refer me to a Rheumatologist, but when I eventually was, I was triaged as urgent & was seen in weeks. Some people have had to wait over 12 months to get into them, so for that I am very grateful.

From there I was diagnosed first as Undifferentiated Spondyloarthropathy, and as my symptoms progressed, and more specific symptoms presented, I was eventually diagnosed with Psoriatic Arthritis.

The majority of my other conditions were more easily & quickly diagnosed.

The hardest part of living with my illness/disabilities is…

The fatigue. Pain is something I have learned to manage, but the severely depleted energy levels is not something I have ever been able to successfully become accustomed to.

A typical day for me involves…

  • Wake up around 730am.
  • Medication and breakfast (if I am feeling up to it, sometimes I am too tired/nauseous).
  • Feed the cat. He will look at me forlornly (and disdainfully) if I don’t 😉
  • Work is from 9am – 530pm. (I have had my start time adjusted to 9am from 830am so that I am able to manage morning stiffness from my PsA. This gives me an extra 1hour at home due to peak hour traffic!)
  • Home for dinner around 6pm. Sometimes I have cooked something, othertimes it is takeaway or a pre-delivered meal service like Lite & Easy.
  • Medications around 7pm as one is to prepare for sleep.
  • Bed at 9pm after a shower usually. I do a nighttime meditation to help sleep.

The one thing I cannot live without is…

 My cat. He is my ever present comfort, amusement & joy throughout the trials & tribulations of chronic illness. 

Being ill/disabled has taught me…

To slow down & enjoy life. I am so relaxed about life & what I am able to enjoy now.

My support system is…

My family & close friends. They are essential to my emotional wellbeing 😊 

If I had one day symptom/disability-free I would…

Walk up a mountain to have a picnic, visit a remote Indigenous site in Australia that requires lots of walking to access & camp under the stars without my CPAP machine! 

One positive of having a chronic illness/disability is…

The people I have connected with as a result 😊 . The connections I have made since becoming chronically ill have become incredibly important and special to me, and I have made some lifelong friends.

Having people in your life who understand the difficulties associated with chronic illnesses and disabilities, can relate to the challenges and frustrations you face every day and truly care about your wellbeing can never be underestimated.

One final thing I want people to know is:

Its OK not to be OK.

The biggest challenge for me has been slowing down & how difficult that has been at times. I was always an active person before I became unwell; always taking on lots of challenges. Now, I have to drastically limit my activities in any given day as overactivity can bring on severe flares. This was a huge change for me & emotionally I was quite overwhelmed & became very anxious.

I want all people to know it is ALWAYS OK to tell others that they need more support if they are finding the emotional toll of their chronic illness/disabilities too hard to manage on their own.

My links are:

https://acrabbycripple.wordpress.com/

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Interview October – Keiran Potter

It’s time to meet my next guest, the fabulous Keiran Potter! I’m excited about what he has to share!

Keiran Potter

Introduce yourself and tell us a bit about you…

Hello, my name is Keiran Potter, I am 21 years old and I am from the South West of England. I am currently studying English Literature and Creative Writing at University and hope to pursue a career as a writer if all goes to plan. But you know what they say, best laid plans of mice and men often go awry. 

One fascinating fact about me is:

Not sure how fascinating any of my facts are but I am 22 this month and still often get mistaken for a 12 year old at my local shops. Oh and I’m gay, not fascinating but definitely a fact. 

Chronic illness(es)/disabilities I have…

Celiac Disease and Various Mental Health problems but for the sake of this interview I’ll focus on the former

My symptoms/condition began…

The symptoms of Celiac were present for an awful long time before I recognised them as something that could be potentially sinister. The stomach pain, migraines and bleeding had been such a regular thing for me, that it became the norm and I failed to question it for a long time. So I’d say as long as I remember I have had the issue but it wasn’t further explored until May 2018 

My diagnosis process was… 

 I had to have blood tests and several other samples. Celiac Disease can share some symptoms with other serious conditions like intestinal cancers, so my doctor was pretty concerned. Once they came back I got referred to a specialist on a 9 month waiting list. In the interim they told me to research about Celiac Disease and cut out Gluten from my diet. They failed to tell me that by doing this it would also put other aspects of my health at risk. Such as my heart. 

When I was referred I was then asked to eat Gluten again after being gluten-free for 9 months, in order to have an upper endoscopy and biopsy of my intestines. 

So all of my symptoms got more aggressive and I was in constant pain as my body had began healing in the 9 months that I had known about my potential diagnosis 

The first biopsy was inconclusive. I had to wait another 3 months and get another one done. It was quite a hellish experience to be honest but I finally got the 100% confirmation of the disease. Which in many ways was a blessing as I finally had some answers 

The hardest part of living with my illness/disabilities is…

The constant vigilance and endless fatigue and stomach pain. Even when doing everything you should be doing. Sometimes you have issues for no apparent reason and there is literally no answer to appease your concerns or pain. 

A typical day for me involves…

 A lot of thinking ahead about the risks of everyday living. Such as eating or spending the day out of the house in an unfamiliar place. A lot of time spent on or near a toilet. University, I study English and Creative Writing. Lots of medication but thankfully a lot of laughs 

The one thing I cannot live without is…

 Not really a thing but my support system and the people who help and love me the most. I quite literally would not be alive if it wasn’t for them. 

Being ill/disabled has taught me…

To value every aspect of your life for what it is. You never know when those simple joys may be taken from you. It has also made me more appreciative of health in general. Our bodies are not as indestructible as we may like to think sometimes  

My support system is…

My Family, my mum specifically. I don’t think I would show up to half of the appointments I have if it wasn’t for her dragging me there by the ear. I’m very grateful for all the help and care she gives me 

If I had one day symptom/disability-free I would…

 Eat some Chinese food and go do something productive and just enjoy the day without the illness. I would take advantage of some of the freedoms that I feel I don’t have as much access too since my illnesses have truly taken a hold on my life

One positive of having a chronic illness/disability is…

I think one positive is how you can then use your knowledge of your own body and conditions to educate and help others. There is also a sense of community instantly when you find people who struggle with the same illnesses and experiences. It’s important that all voices are heard, so I’m glad interviews like this amplify the voices of disabled or chronically ill people. 

One final thing I want people to know is:

 Only because a person may not look ill, it doesn’t mean they are not struggling everyday to live their life as normally as possible. Always be kind to everyone you meet as even if you can’t physically see it, that person could be in pain and/ or mental strife. A smile could always brighten up their day 

My links are:

Https://KeiranCrying.com/blog

Instagram.com/keirancrying

Interview October – Melissa Temple

I’m pleased to announce that Melissa Temple is my next guest for Interview October. Let’s read what this lovely lady has to say:

Introduce yourself and tell us a bit about you… 

Hi. My name is Melissa Temple. I am 40 years old. I am a disability, fibromyalgia, chronic illness and Disney blogger. I am married and have 1 child. I had a blog called HappyFibroGirl but wanted to do more than fibro. So with my husband of 19 years we started Disabled Disney. 

Chronic illness(es)/disabilities I have…

Osteo-Arthritis, Fibromyalgia, Depression, Anxiety, Type 2 Diabetes, Asthma, Endometriosis.

My symptoms/condition began…

I had arthritis symptoms in my 20’s but wasn’t diagnosed until my 30’s. My fibro symptoms really started after having knee surgery and a hysterectomy from severe endometriosis. 

My diagnosis process was…

I went to my primary care and told her about all my pain. She said she was pretty sure I had fibromyalgia. She sent me to pain management. The pain management doctor agreed. 

The hardest part of living with my illness/disabilities is… 

Not being able to do everything I used to be able to do. I can’t hardly walk or stand anymore. I used to dance, hike, swim, and do so many physical things! I used to be a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) but I had to stop because I couldn’t stand anymore for long periods.

A typical day for me involves… 

Medications when I wake up..doing some posting on social media for my blog..and eating breakfast…then a nap…then more meds and some more work on my blog and lunch…then another nap…then some more work on the blog if I’m feeling up to it…then more meds and dinner….then watching tv until bed….then more meds…then bed…

The one thing I cannot live without is… 

My husband, my cell phone and my muscle relaxers. My husband is my reason to keep pushing and going, he is my light in the dark and the love of my life. My cell phone is where I do a lot of my blog stuff. It also keeps me connected to the outside world when I am very isolated at home. My muscled relaxers…if I don’t take them I can’t move. 

Being ill/disabled has taught me… 

Really enjoy everything because you may not always have it and you won’t know your about to lose it!

What advice would I give someone recently diagnosed…

Be an advocate for yourself. Yes the doctors have gone to school but you know yourself and you have to live your life…they don’t. 

My support system is…

My hubby, my daughter and all my fibro friends on Facebook and my blogger friends on Twitter.

If I had one day symptom/disability-free I would… 

I would dance, go hiking, run and jump…I would go walking around a mall….I would volunteer and be out!

One positive of having a chronic illness/disability is…

It really shows you who cares about you. 

My social media links are:

Website/blog: www.disableddisney.com

Instagram: www.instagram.com/disableddisney

Twitter: www.twitter.com/disableddisney

Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/disableddisney

Facebook: www.facebook.com/disableddisney

Interview October – Michelle Curtis

It’s time for the annual series I run on There Is Always Hope called Interview October. I have spent time asking questions about health conditions that these amazing people are living with, and their replies help bring education and hope to my readers.

Today, we’re meeting my dear friend Michelle Curtis who runs the blog site The Zebra Pit. Let’s hear her story!

Include a photograph of yourself:

Introduce yourself and tell us a bit about you…

Hello! I’m a 47 year old queer disabled woman living in greater Cincinnati. I live a housebound life due to my conditions. Though I am completely disabled by my conditions, I work from home doing freelance writing and managing two websites. Lately, I’ve been working on reviving my creative writing career as a poet and fiction writer, as I’ve managed to improve my cognitive deficits enough to go back to writing and editing some shorter works.

I have been happily married for over 13 years and have a grown stepson whom I love very much, but get to see very little. I am an avid fan of the arts (both high brow and pop), music and nature and consider myself a lifelong learner. I am a huge fan of sci-fi and fantasy, love to learn about astronomy, archeology and science, and spent much of my life protesting the abuse of marginalized peoples and our planet.

I hold a BA in women, gender and sexuality studies with minors in ethnic studies and creative writing and a master of fine arts degree in creative writing. Prior to becoming disabled by my conditions, I worked as everything from a cab driver to a college instructor and have experience in the fields of education, communications, business administration, human resources, healthcare and non-profits, not to mention my illustrious career in retail and banking prior to going to college. 

One fascinating fact about me is:

This is always a hard question for me. I think all people are fascinating when you get to know them. I guess the thing that people are usually fascinated the most with is that almost nothing about me is considered conventional: I have disabling genetic disorders, I am neurodivergent, atheist yet spiritual, pansexual and feminist.

Chronic illness(es)/disabilities I have…

I am what is known as a Trifecta Zebra, as I have a trio of rare illnesses that are often seen together; Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (hEDS), Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), and Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS). I also have gastroparesis, IBS, Fibromyalgia, ME/CFS, Dystonia, cognitive dysfunction with significant memory loss (both long and short term), coronary arterial spasm,  degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis, CRPS in my right leg, endometriosis, and intractable migraine. I strongly suspect and am seeking diagnosis for chairi and/or craniocervical instability and autism. 

My symptoms/condition began…

As a child, though my symptoms wouldn’t become really apparent until early adulthood.  

My diagnosis process was… 

Fraught with misdiagnoses and errors. Despite my many health problems which I reported to every doctor, I was not diagnosed with EDS until I was almost 45. I was first diagnosed with fibromyalgia around age 40 and CSF a couple of years later. A couple of years after that, I was diagnosed with POTS. I had to find EDS and MCAS, figure out that I had them and then find doctors to diagnose and begin treating them. 

The hardest part of living with my illness/disabilities is…

The cognitive dysfunction. I had developmental delays as a child and everyone thought I was just plain stupid and wouldn’t do much in life. I had terrible self-esteem and no faith in my abilities. I didn’t figure out I was probably pretty smart until my mid-twenties and finally went to college because I simply couldn’t manage doing the only sorts of jobs I could get, those with a high level of physical labor.

I spent years working toward a career I thought would save me and that I loved more than I could ever imagine allowing myself to love anything. By the time I was done, I no longer had the cognitive ability left to actually do the work I’d been trained for, even if I could find ways to accommodate my deteriorating tissues.

I’m glad I’ve found new things to consume my life with and I can’t say I regret the journey. But the knowledge that I could have had a brilliant career had I the capacity to go on is sometimes too much psychic pain to bear. These days I try very hard to focus on what I can accomplish and find focusing on the present helps me to avoid these hard truths.

A typical day for me involves…

I like to say I live on tilt, because I quite literally have to. If I spend too much time in the upright position, I suffer terrible pain and cognitive symptoms and sometimes have seizures. If I’m flat on my back, I develop pain in the back of my head. So I spend much of my day tilted back in a recliner, working on my blogs and writing, trying to avoid the pain caused by being completely upright or completely prone.

Most of my time spent upright is to cook (I cannot tolerate processed foods at all), do therapies and keep up my movement routines of recumbent bike riding and strengthening exercises. In the evening, I try to relax in front of the TV or with a good book. 

 The one thing I cannot live without is…

Myofascial therapy! I’d be in so much pain if not for it!

Being ill/disabled has taught me…

Never to judge other people’s lives or make assumptions about why someone does something.

My support system is…

My husband is my primary source of support, but we both have chronic health conditions so things can get pretty hairy from time to time, but we usually manage! The remainder of my support comes from within the chronic illness/spoonie community.

I know there are any number of people I can turn to for emotional support or needed advice regarding my health and wellness. I would be lost without them, as I have few others in my life.

If I had one day symptom/disability-free I would…

It would be a lot like Ferris Buehler’s Day Off without the teen angst! A great deal of sightseeing, dancing and celebrating of life, topped off by an exciting and romantic evening of a show, an amazing dinner, more dancing and a carriage ride around Fountain Square. 

One positive of having a chronic illness/disability is…

It’s made me take responsibility for my mental health and taught me what real support looks like, allowing me to walk away from all the toxic people in my life.

One final thing I want people to know is: 

No matter how bad things get, there’s always the possibility that things will get better, as long as you keep fighting. I spent years so inundated by symptoms and disabled by my health that I could no longer see the point of living. I nearly took my own life.

I’m so glad I managed to pull myself out of that deep depression, because it turns out I have quite a lot of life left in me. How did I succeed? I started saying yes to anything that I thought could help, searching exhaustively for solutions. It worked! I found my correct diagnoses and ways to treat my pain and symptoms that affords me a life I can live with.

Now I also have some joy and a sense of my own strength. I may not have beat chronic illness, but I am doing a pretty good job of not letting it defeat me and helping others to also find things to help them.

My links are:

https://zebrapit.com a health and wellness site for spoonies and zebras

https://mykiewritesit.blog a site to display my writing services, poetry and short stories, and discuss writing and blogging strategies and techniques.

5 Ways to Handle Fibromyalgia Pain and Stay Energized

I’m pleased to feature this guest post by Kunal Patel, who works with a brand called Copper Clothing.

Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by musculoskeletal pain all over the body. It is often accompanied by fatigue, sleep andmood issues, and cognitive concerns like memory problems. There are several ways to cope with the disorder, from having the right diet to wearing the right clothes.

The Pain of Fibromyalgia

Here are 5 practical ways to cope with fibromyalgia.

Exercise Regularly

It may seem impossible to exercise when you have fibromyalgia but it is recommended you do. Exercising will help in relieving symptoms of fibromyalgia, especially with the stiffness and restless leg syndrome.

Light exercises and yoga also help in boosting the mood, reducing fatigue, easing the pain, improving blood circulation and improving sleep. You can go for a walk, do strength training, cycling, water aerobics, and swimming.

However, if you are too fatigued, avoid exercisingthat day.

Good Sleeping Habits

The pain and stress can hinder with your ability to sleep. However, sleep is essential to manage fatigue – the biggest symptom of the disorder. 

Practice good sleep habits like:

    • Reduce the noises and intensity of lights in the bedroom
    • Use light and comfortable bed linens like a copper bedsheet
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeine, and smoking
  • Sleep and wake up at the same time
  • Adopt bedtime rituals like taking a soothing bath or journaling before bedtime

Proper Diet

10 Mental Health Habits to Try This 2019 - Eat Well

Your fibromyalgia diet must include lots of vegetables, fruits, dairy, whole grains, and lean meats. This will improve the overall health, lower weight and energize you. Eliminating sugar, foods containing food additives like MSG, and aspartame will be beneficial.

Wear the Right Clothes

Clothing choices can make a huge difference in managing daily pain and fatigue that comes with fibromyalgia. Those suffering from fibromyalgia suffer from a condition where even the slightest touch can be quite painful. Wearing loose-fitting, non-constricting and lightweight clothing is recommended.

Copper compression clothing is also used to treat fibromyalgia pain and stiffness.This disorder can affect any muscle in the body, however, it is most common in extremities like hands and fingers. Copper compression gloves provide fibromyalgia hand pain relief due to their properties. They fight inflammation, retain warmth, improve blood flow and restore movement in the hand.

Choose cotton or copper socks as they don’t have chemicals, wick away sweat and fight odors. The latter also help in reducing pain in the legs and feet.

Stay Positive

There Is Always Hope

Living with pain and overcoming fatigue is not easy and it can get exhausting. Your mind may play tricks on you and be stuck in a loop that you are not accomplishing anything. However, it will do you no good to ruminate on those things. It is essential that you stay positive.

Do not focus on the things that fibromyalgia is preventing you from doing as it will make you feel worse. It is alright to have a bad day– just focus on getting through each day and celebrate little victories.

Consult with your doctor about the best pain management techniques. Take one day at a time and this disorder can become a lot more bearable.

Author Bio –

Screen Shot 2019-09-05 at 3.07.15 PM

Kunal Patel is a young and passionate entrepreneur, fascinated by the workings of the human body and natural solutions for common health problems. He’s single-minded in his aim to make Copper Defence a brand that’s recognized across the globe, by partnering with global brands to make these high-tech materials easily accessible for everyone.

You Know What Omega-3s Are – But What About Omega-6s?

Today I’m featuring an article by Guest Author Nicole Ross Rollender. Her bio is at the bottom of the page. She’s written an excellent post about Omega-3s and Omega-6s and how important they are for our bodies. When you live with Chronic Pain, you know you need to do everything possible to maintain your overall health, and diet can play a part in that. Read on to see what Nicole has to say:

Positivity Quotes

No doubt you’ve gotten the skinny on good fats (hello, omega-3) from your primary care doctor or nutritionist.

You’ve probably heard this before: Omega-3 fatty acids like EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) are found in fish oils from salmon, krill, tuna, trout, mackerel, and sardines, along with oysters and crabs.

Clinical evidence suggests omega-3s like EPA and DHA help reduce risk factors for heart disease, including high cholesterol and high blood pressure, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

You’ll find other omega-3s like alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) in flaxseed, oils like canola and soybean, and nuts and seeds such as walnuts and sunflower, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Omega 3 and Omega 6 For Your Good Health

Along with omega-3s, omega-6 fatty acids play a vital role in brain function, and our normal growth and development. 

Bottom line: Your body needs fatty acids to function, and they pack some major health benefits.

However, not as many people have heard of omega-6s. Here’s what you need to know to ensure you’re getting enough (but not too much) of this important fat in your diet.

What Are PUFAs?

Here’s a quick chemistry lesson: Like omega-3, omega-6 is a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), a fat molecule containing more than one unsaturated carbon bond. For example, oils (like olive oil) that contain polyunsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature, but start to turn solid when chilled, according to the American Heart Association.

“Omega-6s are essential for a whole host of things: proper brain function, stimulating hair and skin growth, maintaining bone health, promoting normal growth and development, regulating metabolism, and maintaining a healthy reproductive system,” says Laura Ligos, MBA, RDN, CSSD, a Real Food registered dietitian at Albany, NY-based The Sassy Dietitian & Designed to Fit Nutrition.

PUFAs offer heart-health benefits when you eat them in moderation and use them to replace unhealthy saturated and trans fats in your diet, according to the Mayo Clinic.

There are saturated fats in animal-based foods, such as meats, poultry, lard, egg yolks and whole-fat dairy products like butter and cheese. They’re also in cocoa butter, and coconut, palm and other tropical oils used in coffee creamers and other processed foods.

Trans fats, also called hydrogenated and vegetable oils, are in hardened vegetable fats like stick butter – and make their way into crackers, cookies, cakes, candies, snack foods and French fries.

A good rule of thumb is to reduce foods high in saturated and trans fats in your diet. Instead, choose foods that include plenty of PUFAs – but don’t go overboard.

All fats, even good ones, are high in calories – they’re nine calories per gram.

The Omega-6/Omega-3 Ratio

Humans evolved on a diet balanced in omega-6 and omega-3 (1:1 ratio) essential fatty acids, according to the journal Nutrients. Today, though, the ratio for many people is a staggering 20:1, contributing to weight gain and other health issues.

“The ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 in our bodies should stay between 2:1 and 3:1,” Ligos says. “You’re heading into dangerous territory when your omega-6/omega-3 ratio is greater than 4:1.”

Both a high omega-6/omega-3 ratio and a high omega-6 fatty acid intake contribute to weight gain, whereas a high omega-3 fatty acid intake decreases your risk for weight gain, according to Nutrients.

In addition, when your omega-6/omega-3 ratios are out of balance, you’re at higher risk for cardiac issues, according to the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology

“When there isn’t enough omega-6 in your diet, essential fatty acid deficiency can occur, leading to excessive thirst and skin lesions, as well as more serious issues like stunted growth, skin lesions, a fatty liver, and reproductive issues or failure,” Ligos says.

Conversely, too much omega-6 (and not enough omega-3) can cause inflammatory conditions including heart disease, elevated blood pressure, diabetic neuropathy, autoimmune conditions and more, Ligos notes.

Not all omega-6 fatty acids promote inflammation though, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

Linolenic acid, often found in vegetable oils, is converted to gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) in the body. GLA is also found in plant-based oils like evening primrose oil, borage oil and black currant seed oil.

“There’s research to support taking a GLA supplement, an omega-6 fatty acid, to reduce inflammation, much unlike all other omega-6 fatty acids,” Ligos says.

The body converts GLA to DGLA, which fights inflammatory conditions, and having enough other nutrients like magnesium, zinc, and vitamins C, B3 and B6, promotes that conversion, the University of Maryland Medical Center says.

Where to Get Your Omega-6

The good news is most of us can get the right amount of omega-6 from a healthy diet alone.

“Omega-6 fatty acids are found primarily in vegetable and plant oils, including safflower, sunflower, grapeseed, corn, cottonseed, peanut, sesame, soybean and canola,” Ligos says.

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At one time, researchers believed omega-6 fatty acids metabolized in the body to then inflame and damage artery linings, which could lead to heart disease.

After reviewing the findings, the American Heart Association recommended people eat between 5% and 10% of their daily calories from omega-6 fatty acids.

It’s a good idea to replace saturated fats from foods like meat, butter, cheese and deserts with plant-based foods containing omega-6 fatty acids, including vegetables oils, nuts and seeds is a good first step.

Flaxseed and hempseed oil, nuts, borage oil, evening primrose oil and black currant seed oil, and acai are other healthy sources of omega-6.

About The Author:

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Nicole Rollender is a South New Jersey-based editor and writer. Her work has appeared in Good Housekeeping, Dr. Oz The Good Life, Woman’s Day and Cosmopolitan. She’s the author of the poetry collection Louder Than Everything You Love. Recently, she was named a Rising Star in FOLIO’s Top Women in Media awards and is a 2017 recipient of a New Jersey Council on the Arts poetry fellowship. Visit her online at www.strandwritingservices.com; on Facebook or Twitter.

3 Important Lifestyle Changes (That Can Improve Your Overall Health)

Today’s post is from Guest Author Amanda Lasater. She’s bringing us information on important Lifestyle changes that can help improve your overall health.

For those of us suffering from Chronic Pain, Chronic Fatigue, or an Invisible Illness, it can feel like you’ve tried pretty much everything to improve your mental and physical well-being. Whether we’re trying a new “miracle” treatment in traditional medicine or an “ancient” holistic therapy, it’s easy to simply feel defeated by our illness. And, like with all illnesses, there will likely never be a one-size-fits-all treatment for these conditions – however, there are lifestyles changes that have been shown to significantly help improve the quality of life for those suffering from many of these life-altering illnesses. The following list contains three powerful choices in your day to day life that, over time, can help reduce the physical and mental anguish that comes along with these maladies.

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Incorporate CBD Oil Into Your Supplement Regimen

Due to the relatively new popularity of CBD oil, we don’t have enough long-term studies to make any definitive statements about its efficacy as a treatment for chronic pain, fibromyalgia, and other invisible illnesses. However, the studies we do have, combined with personal testimonies, are extremely promising. CBD – short for cannabidiol – is extracted from the cannabis plant, but it does not have any of the psychoactive properties of THC (aka, it doesn’t get you “high”). Currently, it is being used for a large number of medical purposes, including:

  • Chronic pain and inflammation
  • Epilepsy, especially in children
  • Social anxiety disorder
  • Insomnia
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Schizophrenia

So far, CBD has been shown to help with three major symptoms of many invisible illnesses: pain, anxiety, and insomnia. And for many suffering from any of these conditions, relief from even just one of these symptoms would significantly improve their quality of life. We recommend that you research CBD and your specific illness to identify all the potential benefits and decide upon which brand and dosage is best for you.  

Address Your Microbiome And Gut Health

The gut “microbiome” is what we call the highly important collection of more than 100 trillion microscopic organisms, or microbiota, that live inside our gastrointestinal tract. These organisms, which include bacteria unique to your body, play a vital role in our health by contributing nutrients and energy, protecting against infection, and supporting the immune system. In addition, we’ve discovered that these trillions of bacteria in our gut communicate directly with the neurons in our brains. More and more studies have found a link between the condition of the microbiome and many illnesses including

  • Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD)
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Chronic Pain
  • Autoimmune disorders

Often accompanying gut dysbiosis is an overgrowth of candida (a fungus or yeast), which releases toxic byproducts into your bloodstream and causes a host of unpleasant symptoms. Many doctors report that most fibromyalgia sufferers have had Candida overgrowth. The bottom line is that the gut biome is essential to our health – and addressing and improving your gut health can improve many symptoms of invisible illnesses. The best ways to improve your gut bacteria include eating probiotic foods, eating fiber and prebiotics, avoiding antibiotics (unless absolutely necessary), quitting smoking, reducing alcohol intake, avoiding excessive sugar consumption, exercise, and eating gut-friendly foods like bone broth. 

Start An Elimination Diet To Identify Food-Related Health Issues

The food you’re eating may be the cause of many of your symptoms. For example, gluten has been linked to over 55 diseases. In fact, the major symptoms of gluten intolerance are neurological – not digestive. These common symptoms include: 

  • Chronic pain
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Depression 
  • Cognitive impairment 
  • Sleep disturbances

Gluten intolerance is identified as one of the possible root causes of fibromyalgia by many practitioners of functional medicine – a branch of medicine that aims at treating the underlying cause of an issue instead of the symptoms. The best way to identify if you have any allergies or intolerances is to start an elimination diet and introduce foods one at a time.

While we have all felt defeated by our illnesses, we’ve also learned the importance of always keeping our head up and moving forward. We’re here to tell you that you’re not alone – use these three lifestyle changes to drastically improve your quality of life and “keep on swimming.”

About The Author

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Amanda Lasater is on the editorial and research team at MattressAdvisor.com, a mattress reviews site with the mission to help each person find their best sleep ever.