A Chronical of Hope…

I have been loving the experience of blogging and went into it with no expectation of making money. I wanted to write about Chronic Pain and Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia and Invisible Illness. I didn’t even think it was possible to make money writing about subjects like that, but apparently, there is a way to monetize a blog to do just that. So…I’ve started a second blog.

The name of the new blog is A Chronical Of Hope – notice the play on words with Chronical, rather than the typical Chronicle? I have to tell you something funny about that. I use a free program called Grammarly for my writing online to make sure I’m spelling things correctly and using proper grammar (you’d be surprised how many times I use commas inappropriately!). When I registered the new domain name at Hover.com, there was no problem…www.achronicalofhope.com is all mine. But when I went to the hosting site Bluehost.com to actually host the domain, Grammarly corrected the word Chronical to Chronicle and I didn’t notice (I was doing this at 3am) and it totally screwed up everything. I couldn’t launch my new site for the life of me, and I couldn’t figure out why…everything was set up properly, everything was pointing in the right direction, but nothing…it would not come up online. I finally noticed the problem and a fine young man named Deepak at the Helpdesk spent 30 minutes working with me to resolve the problem – most of the time being taken because it takes time to switch things over. I had to laugh…good old Grammarly, doing its job too well!

I’m also doing something a tiny bit different in that I’m using WordPress.org, instead of WordPress.com to produce content on the new blog. All this means is that I own the content of A Chronical Of Hope – on WordPress.com, they own everything, because you are being hosted on their platform, which is why it’s free. I pay Bluehost a fee to host my new blog so I own the content. Big difference.

The main reason I’ve started the second blog though is that I plan on turning it into a monetizing blog – one where I can earn money.  I could do that with There Is Always Hope, but I would have to change-up my theme again and make a bunch of other changes to it, and I’m just not prepared to do that. I want to keep this blog for simply writing for the joy of writing. I will be marketing A Chronical Of Hope in a different way although to the same audience – those who live with Fibro and Chronic Pain and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Invisible Illness. I’ll be working with Affiliates such as Amazon, selling products that would appeal to people with those conditions and I will use this blog to cross-market by linking to A Chronical Of Hope when appropriate. I also have plans to sell my e-Book on the other blog as well as I wasn’t able to set it up to sell on this one.

e-Book you say? Yes, I put together an e-Book with 30 Positive Affirmations in .pdf format so you can carry positive words in your heart. If your device can open a .pdf file, you can take these words with you wherever you go and read them whenever you need them. All done up in a pretty format, I think you’ll like it. Just $3.00 and payable via PayPal. You can click here to order if you’re interested and it’s now available to order off the last post as well.

I hope you’ve been enjoying my blogging journey as much as I have been. I’ve received a lot of positive feedback on my writing and the topics I’ve chosen to write about and I hope to bring you more in the near future. Thank you for following me. I appreciate each and every one of you. Remember…

There is always hope!

 

August Link Ups

August Link Ups for A Chronic Voice

I’m taking part in my very first Link Ups on the blog A Chronic Voice.  Sheryl is the Authoress of the page and she hosts these online parties every month, providing 5 word prompts to help get us writing. We’re allowed to submit one post per month utilizing these prompts, so I thought I’d give it a go.

Prompts for the Month

  1. Figuring
  2. Completing
  3. Boring
  4. Cuddling
  5. Chatting

1.Figuring: I spend a lot of time figuring out what I want to share with my readers when I’m writing up new blog posts. A lot of my posts have to do with my own personal health, but sometimes I switch things up and share about other things, such as our pets that bring us such comfort when we’re feeling ill, or about body image or feeling invisible. But I often wonder if that’s what my readers want, or if they want more generalized posts about Fibro and Invisible Illnesses, so I second guess myself a lot. I’m a fairly new blogger, having only seriously been at it for the last 3 months now. I think my best bet is to mix it up and include a variety of posts and see what type of comments and traffic I get and just decide from there if I’m doing the right thing.

2. Completing: When I’m in pain, I tend to start a lot of different projects to keep my mind busy, but I’m not always good about completing them. I have half done crafts all over the place – artwork I’ve started and never finished, a multi-media piece that I don’t know what to do with, beads that I want to make something with, polymer clay that I want to create with, crochet needles and yarn that I bought to teach myself how to make a scarf and a needlepoint kit of a cow, because I love cows. I need to learn how to focus on one thing at a time, complete that particular project and then move on to something new instead of having 6 different things going and none of them being worked on.

3. Boring: Being housebound because of Chronic Illness can be awfully boring sometimes. You wouldn’t think so with all the things I have that I could be doing, like all the projects I just mentioned. I could also be watching Netflix or reading a book or making a coffee date, but here’s the thing…most of the time, I hurt too much to consider doing much of anything at all. I try not to complain to anyone, least of all my husband, but most days, I start off by having a wee cry. The rest of the day is basically one long blur of bore with each day the same as the one before. I’m always up super early because I don’t sleep well, I spend a lot of time on Facebook, I work on my blog, I play a few Facebook games, I spend time with our cat Dorie, and I wait for the mail. Hubby comes home, we have dinner, he goes to bed fairly early, I do more on Facebook or my blog and finally, around midnight, I try going to sleep, just to wake up at 4am to start all over again. Boring!

4. Cuddling: I am 5’2″ tall and my husband Ray is 6’5″ tall. You wouldn’t think so, but it makes for perfect cuddling!  When I hug him, my ear is right at the level of his heart and I can hear how his heartbeat quickens when we connect like that. Laying together, we fit like two perfect pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, each body part meshing with the other. We spoon together, I snuggle up to him – no matter how we cuddle together, it’s always a perfect fit.

5. Chatting: I love chatting online with people and the one thing I can honestly say about myself is that I love to help other people. I stay up to date on current affairs, but mostly, I’m a counsellor. I like to listen to people and it seems they naturally like to share their problems with me. I’ve lived an interesting life and have a lot of common sense, so I enjoy offering them good old fashioned advice like Ann Landers. That’s why I was delighted to find websites like Quora and The Mighty  – they’re perfect for me. I’m able to share my knowledge and wisdom with others while learning at the same time.

So, there we have it, my first attempt at the Link Up Challenge! I hope you all enjoy the read and decide to follow me for more of my posts. Just click the little “follow me” button on the right side of the page and voila! you’re done! You’ll get an email every time I post something new.

Thanks for your ongoing support. I blog to share my thoughts, to educate the public on Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Invisible Illness and to give from the heart. Remember…

There is always hope

The Mighty Strikes Again!

I really love The Mighty. It’s an empowering website for people with Chronic Illness to share and learn and they encourage input from people like me, who live with Invisible Illnesses. This is from their website:

The Mighty is a digital health community created to empower and connect people facing health challenges and disabilities.

We have over 1 million registered users and are adding a new one every 20 seconds.

Our stories and videos are viewed and shared more than 90 million times a month.

But those are just stats. This experience from a community member is what we’re really after:

“How is it that I read an essay on The Mighty and it is the only place in the world where I feel truly understood? Time and time again you speak to me through your contributors. I read this headline and it could have come from my very lips…I wanted to say thank you – words can never express how truly grateful I am to the author for sharing her story, for all Mighty contributors, and to The Mighty itself. You have changed my life. I have made a close friend who lives many miles away because of our shared pain. I gain insight every day and I finally, finally do not feel so alone in this world. Thank you. Bless you!”

I’ve had one story published already and now they’ve gone ahead and published a second article of mine. They took my post Some Body To Love and condensed it so it can be shared with the world. I’d love it if you’d check it out here!!

There is always hope!

Some Body To Love

I love my body! Despite the fact it’s a piece of crap on the inside and has been for a very long time…I still love it!  220px-Breathe-face-smile.svg

It’s not a model’s body, not by any stretch of the imagination, but my husband still finds it attractive after 24 years together. He took this photo back in 2011 when we went on our first cruise and when I asked him if he could find it (because I wanted to show it to our daughter to prove I looked good in a two-piece back then), he looked at me almost in disbelief and said “of course I can find it”. He knew exactly where it was because it’s a favourite of his.

Pam'sButt

I was 49 when this photo was taken and I’m 56 now. I don’t look quite the same as back then but I’m working on it. I’ve had a hip replacement since this was taken plus another surgery, as well as many years of increased pain with my Fibromyalgia and other illnesses. In fact, over half of the Invisible Illnesses I live with now didn’t even exist in my body when Ray snapped this photo. But I still love my body, just the way it is right now.

I’m 5’2″ tall and I weigh about 145lbs right now. I fluctuate up to 150lbs. I have strong arms and legs, but my fingers and hands are weak. Once upon a time in 2008 in Calgary AB, I walked a Half Marathon in -23 degree temperatures (with a windchill of -30). The annual Running Room Hypothermic Half Marathon is quite famous and is now held in cities across North America.  This was my very first time – I took a training program but hadn’t trained properly near race day because of my health and really, I probably shouldn’t have even done it. However, I finished in 3:30:22 and in fact it was such a good race time that Ray almost didn’t make it to the finish line in time to take photos of me crossing (it was a surprise for me). I was delighted to finish and vowed I would never do anything like that again (I got a tiny bit of frostbite under my chin which was the only area left exposed).

HypoHalfMedal

I love my body now, but there was a time when I mourned for the body I used to have. Back in the mid-2000’s, I used to be in great shape. I went to the gym, I had a trainer named Terrianne and I lifted weights – heavy weights. I was doing 40lb bicep curls and 80lb hip abductors and at one point, I could leg press 800lbs. Yes, you read that right…I could leg press 800lbs. I was well muscled and toned and in the best shape of my life. It was only because of 3 unexpected surgeries between 2006 and 2007 that my life derailed and I was unable to recuperate properly. In fact, I had barely done any proper training for the Hypothermic Half when the Marathon actually took place, so to finish in the time I did was a real testament to the shape I’d been in previously. We really take our bodies for granted when they’re running well, don’t we?

I still love my body! Even after everything it’s put me through with surgeries, and Fibro and Chronic Pain and Chronic Fatigue and all the other Invisible Illnesses, it’s the only body I have, so I try to stay positive and treat it well. I like to try to keep my mind sharp as well so I enjoy doing things like word search puzzles and crosswords and I’ve always enjoyed those online hidden object games. Because I don’t get out of the house a lot, I do tend to spend a lot of time on the computer, but sometimes, I’m aware of being “housebound”. It’s an awful sensation and it makes me feel like an invalid. A shut-in if you will. How about you? Do you ever feel that way?

Unfortunately, I have to use a cane for mobility purposes. I’ve had my right hip replaced and it works great, but my left hip still needs to be replaced in the near future. Additionally, my Left Achilles Tendon has been giving me problems for quite some time and even though I’ve seen a physiotherapist, he’s not been able to do much for me. We’ve tried massage and acupuncture and he feels that there’s not really much else that will help the problem, which he thinks is more with the tendon attaching at the bone. Ultrasound isn’t going to improve anything, so after 4 sessions, we’ve called it quits. The other reason for using a cane is that my right knee has problems with severe pain and an occasional buckling and collapsing problem. It’s arthritis that causes this and so I wear a knee brace and use the cane for stability.

Sometimes, when I’m out running errands, I have to use a rollator because the distance is too far for just a cane. Mine is bright orange and made by Hugo:

s-l300

I call it my “Pambourghini”. Seriously though, it’s great for use around downtown Langford where I live, or when I take the bus to the doctor because it folds up with one hand and it’s easy to transport if Ray and I take the truck somewhere instead.

Here’s the thing though – I don’t want to be defined by my Chronic Pain, and just because I use a mobility device doesn’t mean I don’t want to look my best at the same time. I try to dress fashionably but I also have my own unique sense of style. I can’t wear high heels, so I tend to wear shoes that have some sparkle to them. I love long dresses for a more feminine touch, and over the course of the last three years, I’ve gone from having summer hair (practically bald) to short hair to long hair.

And when I have a chance to go out with friends or with my husband on a rare date night, I want to look good. I want to dress up and be pretty and look like every other person around me. I don’t want someone to be able to pick me out of the room and say “oh, there’s the one with chronic pain”.

But while I care very much about how I look, I’m often too tired or too sore to go anywhere and when I do go out, it’s usually a medical appointment. The last person I need to impress is my doctor. In fact, I generally want him to see me at my worst, so he knows what my day-to-day look really does look like.

GWSoonFlu

In order to try to take care of myself, I’ve recently taken on a 30 Day Challenge to do 20 Squats, 20 Wall Push-ups and 20 Bicep Curls every day. I want to try and be as fit as I can in the body I have but I know I need to start slow so I don’t cause a Fibro flare-up. This was my modified answer to an invitation from a friend for a 100 Squats a Day Challenge. So far, I’m on Day 2 and I’ve done both days in good form!!! Go me! I set an alarm on my iPhone to remind me what to do and when, and I’m determined to follow through!

There was a time when I didn’t always feel this way. I felt like my body had betrayed me. It was hard to go from being so healthy to suddenly being bedridden half the time, or unable to go for a walk without using a cane. It was frightening to think that this was going to be my future, and chances were it wasn’t going to get better, only worse. And in a lot of ways, it’s been true. I’ve had to give up hobbies I loved because I don’t have the stamina to keep doing them.

When I lived in Calgary, AB, I used to sing in a women’s 4 part a cappella Barbershop Chorus called Rhythm of the Rockies, and in a quartet called Quintessence. We were part of Sweet Adelines International and our chorus would compete in Regional Competition against other choruses from BC, AB and SK – we were the All Canadian Region, Region 26! The winner of the Chorus competition would go on to International competition the following year. In 2005, Quintessence decided to compete for the first time in the Quartet competition and ended up winning Novice Quartet of the Year!! I think we placed 10th out of 16 Quartets as well. We were so proud of ourselves!!!

Quintessence

Quintessence Quartet: Cheryl (Baritone), Pamela (Bass), Lauri (Lead), Judith (Tenor)

Rehearsals became too much for me, when pain and fatigue took over my life. We competed one more year, in 2006 but that was my final year of singing, including in the chorus. What a huge disappointment that was for me. I had been singing in some form or fashion for most of my life. And now, that was gone. It’s even harder now that I live where I live as the very excellent Pacific Edge Chorus from Sweet Adelines rehearses just down the road from me. I would love to be a part of singing again but I just don’t think I could manage the energy required to be involved again. I have to be honest though…every Tuesday night, I’m teased by the fact there’s a rehearsal going on!!

How do you feel about your body? Do you feel like your body has betrayed you since you first developed Fibromyalgia? What has Fibro taken from you? Did you used to be involved in any crafting or hobbies that you had to give up?

Do you still like your body?

Despite everything, I still love my body. I’ve forgiven it for what its gone through. I know it’s not it’s fault, it just is what it is. Overall, on the outside, I think I’m aging well. I have no wrinkles, lots of silver in my hair which I love, and the older I get, the more content I seem to be with life in general. I’m in love with my hubby, my kids are doing well in their lives and my three grandsons are all happy and healthy. Those are the things I like to focus on, not the parts that are breaking down left, right and centre. I try to remain positive and stay joyous. Contentment IS achievable, but it takes fortitude and the right mental attitude.

If you’re struggling, I invite you to reach out. I have a wonderful little booklet with some powerful words from women I’d be happy to pass along to you, so if you’d like that, send me a message using the Contact Page. It’s about more than just body image…it’s empowering in many different ways, but all about being a strong woman. And that’s how I like to think of myself. I am a strong woman!

Our bodies are complex, but they’re all we have. Let’s all be strong and learn to love them again, just as they are.

Remember…

there is always hope

Something Different…

And now for something completely different!

Every now and then, I like to put something on this blog that is seemingly unrelated to Chronic Pain, Fibromyalgia and/or Invisible Health. I like to change it up a little as you might remember from Fun and Games.

Today, I’m sharing something that again has been floating around the Internet forever. I’ve changed it to encompass my Children, not just my daughter as the original version goes. I’m proud of both of my kids. They’ve each gone through some difficult circumstances in their lives and come out the other side better people. I’d like to think that advice like this might account for some of it.

Here we go:

❤️❤️❤️❤️  RULES TO TEACH MY CHILDREN ❤️❤️❤️❤️

1. Make your bed every day, even if it’s right before you get in it.

2. You don’t have to wear underwear… if you’re in an accident they’ll just cut your clothes off anyway.

3. Travel light through life. Keep only what you need.

4. It’s okay to cry when you’re hurt. It’s also okay to smash (some) things; but, wash your face, clean your mess, and get up off the floor when you’re done. You don’t belong down there.

5. If you’re going to curse, be clever. If you’re going to curse in public, know your audience.

6. Seek out the people and places that resonate with your soul.

7. Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.

8. 5-second rule. It’s just dirt. There are worse things in a fast food cheeseburger.

9. You are a woman, you do not NEED a man. Or Vice Versa

10. Happiness is not a permanent state. Wholeness is. Don’t confuse these.

11. If you’re staying more than one night, unpack your bag.

12. Never lose your fierce spirit.

13. Be less sugar, more spice, and only as nice as you’re able to without compromising yourself.

14. Can’t is a cop-out.

15. Hold your heroes to a high standard. Then, be your own hero.

16. If you can’t smile with your eyes, don’t smile. Insincerity is nothing to aspire to.

17. Never lie to yourself.

18. HER – your body, your rules. HIM – re-read that.

19. If you have an opinion, you better know why.

20. Practice your passions.

21. Ask for what you want. The worst thing they can say is no.

22. Wish on stars and dandelions, then get to work to make them happen.

23. Stay as sweet as you are.

24. Fall in love often. Particularly with ideas, art, music, literature, food and far-off places.

25. Fall hard and forever in love with nothing but yourself.

26. Say Please, Thank You, and Pardon Me, whenever the situation warrants it.

27. Reserve “I’m sorry” for when you truly are.

28. Naps are for grown-ups, too.

29. Question everything, except your own intuition.

30. You have enough. You are enough.

31. You are amazing! Don’t let anyone ever make you feel you are not. If someone does….walk away. You deserve better.

32. No matter where you are, you can always come home.

33. Be happy and remember your roots; family is EVERYTHING.

34. Say what you mean and mean what you say.

35. No one will ever love you more than I do.

36. Be kind; treat others how you would like them to treat you.

37. If in doubt, remember whose Daughter/Son you are and straighten your crown, and own it like a boss!

Share your thoughts in the comments…is this advice you would give to your children? What is the best advice you have given to them? What was the best advice you ever received from your parents, or the people who raised you?

Do you think any of these pieces of advice DO relate to having an Invisible Illness? If so, which one(s)?

The reason I ask is that I think ALL of these questions could apply to someone with Chronic Pain. For example, #1 – isn’t it nicer to sleep in a bed that’s fresh and cool and made, with the sheets and blankets “just so”? And #6 – we all know that stress increases our pain levels, so by seeking out people and places that resonate with our souls, we are filling ourselves with the kind of peace that can end up helping us heal.

Let’s look at #14 – Can’t is a cop-out. I’m sure we’ve all said we “can’t” do something. Is that really true, or are we saying we can’t because it’s too painful or too overwhelming? Well, can we try something different then, or break the task into smaller pieces? Can we ask for help? Are we automatically saying the word we can’t, without even trying first? Sometimes we do the “kneejerk” reaction, without even stopping to think if something is possible. If we give it a try we might come to realize that not only is it possible, it’s actually quite enjoyable and beneficial at the same time.

For #25, Fall hard and forever in love with nothing but yourself – well, that seems a little narcissistic but if you don’t love yourself first, can you be capable of loving anything else? I believe there has to be a level of self-love in a person in order for them to love other people. You have to know what love is, in order to give love away. And I truly believe that love is for giving away to others!!

And for #37 – well, I think that says a lot too. On your highest pain days, when all seems lost and you don’t think you can go on, sometimes you’re going to have to remember your roots, straighten your crown and own your life like a BOSS! No one knows you better than you and these are the times you have to pamper yourself like never before. Pull out all the stops on your comfort item list and do whatever it takes to feel better.

Go through the list above and see if you make Chronic Pain and Invisible Illness positives from the rest of the numbers. I was able to and even if you’re not a naturally positive person, I think it can be done.

Remember…

There is always hope!

Talkin’ Bout My Ment-al Illness

Did you automatically sing that title as “talking bout my Generation”?  That’s what I was aiming for!

I want to talk about Mental Illness today and the meds I take. I’m not ashamed to say I have Bipolar Disorder but I know there is a huge stigma around having a mental illness and talking about it. There are far too many people who grew up believing you should keep things like that hush hush because it would ruin your reputation, and that of your family if you said anything. People were put away in homes and hospitals who were severely mentally ill, or stories were told about “crazy Aunt Gladys” or “weird Uncle Marvin” and you knew you weren’t supposed to either hear them or repeat them.

Things are changing thank God, and I’ve never been afraid to just come out and say “I am Bipolar” in conversation. It’s a part of me, so why would I hide it? It was actually a relief to finally have a diagnosis because then I knew what those manic highs and depressing lows were all about. Do I like the highs and lows? Sometimes. They can be exciting, and energizing and fun. They can also be ugly and messy and scary. But the overall thing about having BD is that it’s uniquely a part of me. Take it away, and I would be so different. Less courageous. Less outgoing. Less interesting. Less, less, less….

One difficult thing about having a mental illness is the issue of being on medications. What you’re trying to do is balance the chemicals in your brain called Serotonins. Finding the right balance is a tricky business and can sometimes take years. I know people who have been on up to 17 different medications at various times, just trying to find the right combo that works for them. I’ve been lucky in that I was put on Seroquel when I was first diagnosed and it worked well for me for a long time.

It wasn’t until late 2016 when I started experiencing the auditory hallucinations  – I could hear music when others couldn’t, and I knew something was going on. I saw a Psychiatrist to rule out any new mental illnesses, and then Dr. Leong recommended the MRI and EEG I’ve talked about in earlier posts. We also decided to switch the Seroquel to something new and that’s when I started taking the Abilify.

I was nervous about taking it at first because of the list of side effects. I am bolding the ones I’ve experienced so far:

Common Abilify side effects may include:
  • weight gain;
  • blurred vision;
  • nausea, vomiting, changes in appetiteconstipation;
  • drooling (mild, at night);
  • a headache, dizzinessdrowsiness, feeling tired;
  • anxiety, feeling restless;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

Now, why can’t Drug Manufacturers automatically make a drug with weight LOSS as a side effect??  Why is weight GAIN always the big one listed (haha). Seriously…what are they putting in there…hot dogs?? Milkshakes?  Okay, I’d take it in milkshake form (I LOVE milkshakes!), but I just don’t understand this. It must be a filler of some kind. Then there’s drooling. What the hell kind of side effect is that??? DROOLING??? Who thinks these things up?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“Hey Ron”

“Yeah Charlie?”

“Do ya think we should make people drool with this one?”

“Oh yeah…we haven’t added that one in a long time. I bet people miss that side effect…yeah, let’s add it”.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

*snork*   Right!  Okay, so now, I’m fat and drooling. How else can we make this attractive? Oh, I know…let’s make me constipated too! And then we’ll make me super tired, but add in insomnia, so I can’t sleep!! Mwaaaahaaahaaahaaahaaaaa

WitchesBrew1

Yeah…that’s about what it feels like. Seriously, I don’t understand why half these side effects are considered acceptable, but we go ahead and take them, because the side effects are worth the overall benefit of the drug itself. And what benefit am I getting from the Abilify? Well for one thing. I have energy again. And an interest in life. I’m not spending 90% of my day sleeping. I’m doing the household chores again. I’m getting together with friends again – socializing. I’m still in chronic pain, but my brain is in such a better place that I’m managing my pain better. Could I go back to work in this condition? No,  not a chance. My pain and fatigue still wipe me out, and I can only manage small chunks of all of these things, broken up throughout the day, but the fact is, I am able to do them again.

I don’t know how long it went on for, but most of my days on Seroquel were spent either in bed sleeping or in my recliner, playing on the computer. I would aimlessly shift between Facebook and a select few other websites I frequent, like Pinterest, some contest sites and game sites where I enjoy solitaire or various slot machines (not for real money). I still do that now, but it’s in between all the other things I’ve found interest in again. I also tend to do a lot of online shopping. Too much, and this can be part of my mania cycle of BD as well. My husband never says anything as long as I record my transactions in our financial system. But I’m doing other things like crafting again, and I’m making cards again for birthdays and stuff, and I want to learn to crochet again (I was just starting to learn and then boom!, totally lost interest when I started having trouble with the Seroquel and didn’t KNOW I was having trouble with it).

Now, here is the list of SEVERE side effects of Abilify. Again, I am bolding the ones I’ve experienced so far:

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe agitation, distress, or restless feeling;
  • twitching or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs (very rare and only for a moment);
  • mask-like appearance of the face, trouble swallowing, problems with speech;
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself;
  • severe nervous system reaction–very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, feeling like you might pass out;
  • low blood cell counts–sudden weakness or ill feeling, fever, chills, sore throat, swollen gums, painful mouth sores (I get inflamed tastebuds), red or swollen gums, skin sores, cold or flu symptoms, cough, trouble breathing; or
  • high blood sugar–increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, weight loss    **oh LOOK! There’s my weight loss, but look what I have to go through to get it!! 😦

Because I have Type 2 Diabetes, I have to be extra careful in taking this medication. I need to check my blood on a more frequent basis, to make sure I’m maintaining optimum blood sugar levels at all times. I currently inject 14 units of insulin at night only and have done so for about 3 years now. If I notice that my sugars are going quite high on this med, we may have to change that up, and that will be hard for me. I like the benefits of this drug, and I’m not sure I want to start experimenting with other medications.

So…what about you dear reader. Do you have a mental illness? Do you talk about it if you do? Why or why not? Do you know other people who experience prejudice because of a mental illness? How are they treated differently? Do you stand up for them? Advocate for them?

It’s a scary world out there for people with mental illnesses. We never know for sure who our allies are or where we can feel safe talking about our lives and what we experience until we start talking to others. I make myself a safe haven. I talk about my mental illness so others know they can be safe and vulnerable around me. If you need someone to talk to, contact me.  Anything said to me stays private, even from my husband. If you’re on Facebook, look me up. Same with Messenger. Just put the words There Is Always Hope in the subject line, so I’ll know it’s not spam.

If you have anything you’d like to share here, please feel free to add a comment. I do moderate them, but only for spam…everything else gets posted. Thanks for reading and remember…

there is always hope

 

Staying Connected…

Here’s a quick question for you. When you are a patient in the hospital, what do you do for entertainment? Do you watch TV? Read a book or magazine? Surf the internet or check out Facebook? Go for walks or check out the Gift Shop? Or are you mos….woah, woah, WHAT????

GO BACK…surf the internet? Check out Facebook? Don’t you use up a lot of your Data that way? Or does your hospital provide free Wifi?

I was recently invited to be interviewed for a news article about the Nanaimo Regional General Hospital, as it’s the first hospital in BC to offer free Wifi for patients and visitors. Now, we’re not talking blazing fast for video downloads, but good basic Wifi for surfing the Internet while you are in the hospital. I don’t know if this is offered where you live, but it’s brand new for us. There is one other BC hospital trialing this, and the BC Ministry of Health hopes to roll the program out to the rest of the province, though there is no set timeline.

I can tell you from my own experience that this is a very welcome move. I’m not a TV watcher (I don’t even watch at home) and I often don’t feel like reading. So what’s left? I listen to music a lot, but when you hallucinate music, that’s not always the first choice either. Having the chance to message chat with a friend or to be on Facebook or Twitter really appeals to me and I think this will be a very popular decision.

Here is the transcript and sound bytes from the interview:

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Patients and visitors to Nanaimo Hospital can breathe easier knowing they won’t have to worry about racking up high cell phone bills.

Island Health announcing today they’re introducing free wi-fi at the hospital.

Patient partner Pamela Jessen says when it comes to Data usage, it removes a heavy burden from people already in a stressful situation…

Island Health says they hope to expand free Wi-Fi to more of their sites, but there’s no timeline yet in place.

Free Wi-Fi at Nanaimo Regional General Hospital means patients won’t have to feel isolated and disconnected.

Island Health announced the service today, saying the Wi-Fi will be for keeping in touch and using the internet but won’t be able to handle high-def video streaming.

Pamela Jessen with the Patient Voices Network says it removes a great burden from patients but also their visitors…

The service is expected to cost roughly five thousand dollars a year.

It’s paid for by the Nanaimo Hospital Auxiliary, who raise funds for the hospital.

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What about you? Your thoughts in the comments would be appreciated!

As for this idea spreading far and wide?

There is always hope!