One Is The Loneliest Number

Living with Chronic pain is lonely.

I’ve been very lucky in my life with chronic pain in that I have a wonderful support team. My husband is amazing – he truly gets it and understands what I’m experiencing as he’s starting having some chronic pain issues of his own. My kids are terrific too and are my biggest cheerleaders. I’ve been blessed with amazing friends who are sympathetic to what I go through on a daily basis, and who understand when I need to cancel plans at the last minute because of my health.

But I’m lonely.

Chronic pain causes you to isolate yourself because you hurt so much all the time, you just don’t want to be around people, yet you don’t want to be alone either. You never know when a flare is going to happen, so you tend to not make plans because you don’t want to be that flake who is constantly cancelling things. I’d rather try and make spontaneous plans but it never feels spontaneous to me…it actually feels desperate. And nine times out of ten, when I do make plans, I end up cancelling them because I wake up on the day of the big event feeling horrid. It’s generally because I’m exhausted as well as being in pain, but no amount of napping is going to make me feel well enough to go out. Of course, if I didn’t have plans that day, I’d have slept just fine the night before. It seems that I’m busy sleep stressing about the date, knowing I’m going to wake up feeling crappy, and then sure enough because I’m sleep stressing…I wake up feeling crappy! And even though I have great friends, I’m sure they must get tired of me flaking off all the time too.

It’s even harder when the people in your life don’t “get it”. This quote comes from Stephanie Schwerin Uplook from a Facebook Fibro Group I belong to and is used with her permission.

This is what she had to say:

Fibro sucks…having family members that don’t get it and don’t listen to one word you say when you try to explain how and what you feel. It’s not cancer, it’s not something they know anything about, it’s not terminal, it’s not that bad. You look fine…I’m really tired of being brushed off like it’s not that big of a deal. They don’t know how bad it can feel, the physical and mental toll it takes on me. No clue, no sense in trying to explain it. This last flare lasted a week and it was bad yesterday and today I’m tired and sore, I feel like my body is trying to recover from the flare, depression has kicked in. I’m wondering if this is how the rest of my life will be.

You know what’s the most aggravating?? I’ve changed so much of my lifestyle to get rid of this crap and I’ve seen no change. I swim every day, I have weights for the pool, I watch what I eat, I’ve researched and researched, I walk most days, I take magnesium supplements and I’ve seen a Rheumatologist at the Mayo Clinic. Those are just a few of the things…and for everything I’ve done, it seems to be getting worse with every flare. That’s depressing. I’m 49 yrs old and to watch me get out of a sitting position after only 5 mins of sitting, you would think you were watching a 90 yr old. My husband can’t believe how quick my body locks up, even after I’ve been in the pool for an hour or how I can’t turn over in bed once I lay down. Getting up out of bed is another struggle…I’m so tired of this crap. I really don’t talk much about how and what I feel anymore with anyone. I get tired of hearing myself complain about how I feel, I’m sure they do too. I mostly have a good positive attitude and can deal with this but today, I’m tired, I’m tired of all of this.

Wow…that’s painful to read. But it happens to most of us and if you’re reading this and you have Fibro or Chronic Pain of some type, you’re probably nodding your head and recalling when this has happened to you.

Lately, most of my mornings have started off with a good cry…I’m 56 and it just hit me recently that this is NEVER GOING TO GO AWAY. No matter what I do, or how good I treat my body, this Fibro is never going to go away and in fact, will probably get worse as time goes by.

That’s a thought worth getting depressed about. How does one stay positive when that’s what you have to look forward to…nothing but more days of pain and exhaustion and the people you love not understanding you, so you continue to feel guilty about having a disease like this, like it’s your fault somehow.

All I can say for sure is that it’s NOT your fault, and you have to take as good of care of your body as possible and not let the words of others hurt you. They mean well, but they don’t understand what it’s like for us, because there is no way to make them understand. No description we give them of Fibro can possibly come close to actually living it. Just do your best to keep your spirits up, try not to blame them and do what you can to stay as healthy as possible. Find as many comfort measures as you can on the days you feel the worst and make a list of all the things that are good in your life so you can refer back to it on your really bad days. Those are the things I do. I also try to reach out to help others as it takes me out of my head and puts me into “action mode”.

So what do you do when it comes to loneliness? What do you do when you need help? My dear friend Brenda Teichroeb Heywood suggested this particular blog post today. She is a single mom of 7 children ranging in age from adult to 3 and is going through a very difficult situation right now plus getting ready to move. She had this to say:

“I have always been the type of person who did not want to barge in during a sensitive time for someone. In their pain, I did not want to bulldoze my way in and then expect them to be grateful for my “help”. Yet, here I am, desperate for help in this very drowning experience and so many are sitting back and waiting for me to tell them what I want. I am just so overwhelmed, it would be better for someone to just jump in. I wonder if it would be a helpful post to write to those who live with or know people to struggle with chronic pain. Is it better to jump in and help the person? Is it better to respect space and wait?”

I responded back to her:

“Sometimes the people able to help just don’t know how to. Personally, I think people stand back waiting to be asked because they don’t want to interfere with or disrupt a person’s life. They don’t want to intrude. It’s like saying “call me if you need anything”. They’re willing to help, but the onus is on you to reach out for it.”

And she replied:

“It’s hard. To be so exhausted and then still do the asking. One friend has offered over and over that she’ll help me in any way. I’ve asked multiple times for help with packing and sorting and she has yet to show up. Sigh. This is not for forever, but I’m worn thin. And I think the little girl in me just wants to be rescued. Maybe what we need from others is a person by person thing or season by season.”

Isn’t that how we all feel…like we want to be rescued? Yet the only person who can truly rescue us from loneliness is ourselves. If no one knows how we’re feeling, we can’t blame them. And if no one “gets” what we’re going through, we either have to keep finding ways to explain it or realize that perhaps they just don’t want to get it. Maybe they don’t believe us, or maybe they’re too overwhelmed with what we experience. We frighten them with the intensity of our pain and fatigue and finality of this disease. They know it’s never going to end just as much as we do, but they don’t know what to do or say, so they do and say nothing. Or if they say something, it’s a joke. Or a nasty comment. Defence mechanisms come in all shapes and forms, so we can’t take it personally or we’ll go mad.

Loneliness goes hand in hand with Chronic Pain and Chronic Fatigue and all Invisible Illnesses. It’s up to us to learn how we want to manage it. Do we want to reach out to others or have them reach out to us? We need to communicate that to the people we love, so they know what the expectations are. You’d be surprised how many of your friends may be sitting there, waiting for you to call to say you’d love to get together with them – and they’ve just been waiting to hear from you to give the go ahead.

One is the loneliest number but it doesn’t have to be. Pick up the phone, send an email, say hi on Facebook…do whatever is easiest, but make a connection soon. Turn your one into two.

There is always hope.

August Link Ups

August Link Ups for A Chronic Voice

I’m taking part in my very first Link Ups on the blog A Chronic Voice.  Sheryl is the Authoress of the page and she hosts these online parties every month, providing 5 word prompts to help get us writing. We’re allowed to submit one post per month utilizing these prompts, so I thought I’d give it a go.

Prompts for the Month

  1. Figuring
  2. Completing
  3. Boring
  4. Cuddling
  5. Chatting

1.Figuring: I spend a lot of time figuring out what I want to share with my readers when I’m writing up new blog posts. A lot of my posts have to do with my own personal health, but sometimes I switch things up and share about other things, such as our pets that bring us such comfort when we’re feeling ill, or about body image or feeling invisible. But I often wonder if that’s what my readers want, or if they want more generalized posts about Fibro and Invisible Illnesses, so I second guess myself a lot. I’m a fairly new blogger, having only seriously been at it for the last 3 months now. I think my best bet is to mix it up and include a variety of posts and see what type of comments and traffic I get and just decide from there if I’m doing the right thing.

2. Completing: When I’m in pain, I tend to start a lot of different projects to keep my mind busy, but I’m not always good about completing them. I have half done crafts all over the place – artwork I’ve started and never finished, a multi-media piece that I don’t know what to do with, beads that I want to make something with, polymer clay that I want to create with, crochet needles and yarn that I bought to teach myself how to make a scarf and a needlepoint kit of a cow, because I love cows. I need to learn how to focus on one thing at a time, complete that particular project and then move on to something new instead of having 6 different things going and none of them being worked on.

3. Boring: Being housebound because of Chronic Illness can be awfully boring sometimes. You wouldn’t think so with all the things I have that I could be doing, like all the projects I just mentioned. I could also be watching Netflix or reading a book or making a coffee date, but here’s the thing…most of the time, I hurt too much to consider doing much of anything at all. I try not to complain to anyone, least of all my husband, but most days, I start off by having a wee cry. The rest of the day is basically one long blur of bore with each day the same as the one before. I’m always up super early because I don’t sleep well, I spend a lot of time on Facebook, I work on my blog, I play a few Facebook games, I spend time with our cat Dorie, and I wait for the mail. Hubby comes home, we have dinner, he goes to bed fairly early, I do more on Facebook or my blog and finally, around midnight, I try going to sleep, just to wake up at 4am to start all over again. Boring!

4. Cuddling: I am 5’2″ tall and my husband Ray is 6’5″ tall. You wouldn’t think so, but it makes for perfect cuddling!  When I hug him, my ear is right at the level of his heart and I can hear how his heartbeat quickens when we connect like that. Laying together, we fit like two perfect pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, each body part meshing with the other. We spoon together, I snuggle up to him – no matter how we cuddle together, it’s always a perfect fit.

5. Chatting: I love chatting online with people and the one thing I can honestly say about myself is that I love to help other people. I stay up to date on current affairs, but mostly, I’m a counsellor. I like to listen to people and it seems they naturally like to share their problems with me. I’ve lived an interesting life and have a lot of common sense, so I enjoy offering them good old fashioned advice like Ann Landers. That’s why I was delighted to find websites like Quora and The Mighty  – they’re perfect for me. I’m able to share my knowledge and wisdom with others while learning at the same time.

So, there we have it, my first attempt at the Link Up Challenge! I hope you all enjoy the read and decide to follow me for more of my posts. Just click the little “follow me” button on the right side of the page and voila! you’re done! You’ll get an email every time I post something new.

Thanks for your ongoing support. I blog to share my thoughts, to educate the public on Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Invisible Illness and to give from the heart. Remember…

There is always hope

Creature Comforts

Oh, today’s post is a goody!!!

Today, I’m talking about creature comforts…and by that, I mean the pets that bring us comfort when we’re in pain, or just needing a little extra loving. This is a guest post and I’m going to be introducing you to several of my Internet friends and their furry companions.

Lets start with Catherine Taylor and her Bichon Chloe. Catherine shared this with me:

Bichons in general are very loyal and Chloe and I bonded from the start. It was like she imprinted on me … she was my shadow. When she was a pup, we had her outside one day, playing in the girl’s sandbox/play centre. It had a small slide and the girls put her at the top of it and ‘encouraged’ her to slide down it. Chloe was having nothing to do with it. I went to the bottom of the slide, crouched down and called to her. She turned around and saw me and tentatively made her way to the top, looked around once and then slid down to my waiting arms. This dog trusted me 100%. I love animals and feel privileged when an animal trusts me. I believed this dog would risk her life for me, if she had to. We were friends for life.

Chloe1

Chloe comfy in the chair

When I developed fibromyalgia, she stayed by my side as I spent more time in bed resting. She could have stayed near the action (and food) with other members of the family downstairs, but she became a fixture, literally, at my feet and often lying over them. It was like having a weighted therapy blanket (didn’t know about those back then). She wasn’t too heavy, just the perfect amount of pressure to make me feel snug and my feet warm, which are usually cold. She’d stay for the duration while I slept. Wherever I was, she was beside me.

Chloe2

Chloe laying on Mommy’s legs in bed!

As anyone can tell you, it’s comforting and soothing to have the warmth and devotion of another being close by, one that doesn’t require anything from you. Studies have shown that blood pressure and heart rate decrease when petting an animal. Chloe passed away last year and I miss having her by my side.

What a sweetheart!!!

Our next guest is Elaine Zena Feather and her precious rescue baby Felix

Felix is my gorgeous rescue fur baby. He’s been with me almost a year and a half and he was barely more than a kitten when arrived. My granddaughter named him Felix which is also special. We’re not sure if he had been abandoned but he was definitely very nervous. He was happy to come to me straight away and have cuddles but he kept finding little hidey holes when we first got home (including diving into my drawer under the bed and he would not come out lol. My son had to remove the drawer and coax him out. Before long he made himself right at home, stretching his long, furry body out on the carpet.

 

He is such a loving boy and will lie right next to me wherever I am, snuggling up and wanting lots of cuddles. He will lie on my lap and turn himself over so he’s lying in my arms. Then he’ll put his paws up to my face for me to kiss them. I cannot imagine my life without him. He follows me round like a dog and comes running when I call. He’s very vocal and “chats” away to me. He really is a comfort and is loved by all my family. He is also very good with my grandchildren especially my grandson who was totally besotted with him. He has beautifully long fur and is happy to be brushed and will even roll over for me to do both sides lol.

Felix5

Felix showing off his luxurious fur

His one “downfall” is he keeps bringing me “presents” which I do my best to rescue and then release back into the wild. Unfortunately I have ended up being bitten a few times by rescued mice and boy does it hurt. I just sometimes forget because I just want to try to pick them up before they disappear somewhere in my house that I won’t be able to find them. I can’t really blame Felix though because it’s what cats do and we have amazing open fields at the back of us which is a great hunting ground. They say having an animal reduces stress and stroking them is very good to reduce blood pressure but also to keep you alive longer. I totally believe that’s true cos having my snuggles with Felix is wonderful and makes me forgive him anything……..even him waking me up at 4am to go out lol xxx

Felix2

Elaine and Felix cuddling each other

I love how furry Felix is!!

Our next guest is Julie Villefana and her Old English Sheepdog Don Pedro

I have been living and coping with having Fibromyalgia as well as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome for many years. At the beginning I slept a lot, as well as cried and generally felt very unhappy. My mum lived with us, so I was busy hanging out with her. She basically got me out and about as little as I did. Then about 10 years ago my mum had a stroke and was first hospitalized and then placed in a Nursing Home. I was devastated. I had lost my only friend who really understood, or at least tried to understand my new-found life. Even though I am happily married, my hubby is away a lot. So, about 8 yrs ago we decided to get an Old English Sheepdog. We named him Don Pedro and he was 8 weeks old when we brought him home.

DonPedro5

8 weeks old

He was so small that he fit on my mum’s tray on her wheelchair! He forced me to not only have to take him out to do his business and general exercise, but also to learn to smile again. He brought and still does, bring such joy to the world! He attracts attention wherever we are. Many stop to ask questions about him, to which I have to reply, naturally. He made me happy again. Sometimes I feel that I have to dress the part to just take him outside to be seen by the world. Plus, he is such a character and certainly has a personality of his own.

DonPedro3

Playing with his girlfriend

If it weren’t for him my life would be very much duller. He seems to have adopted my lifestyle in that he rests when I do, which is a lot. Plus he seems to sense when I am at my worse and snuggles beside me on our bed. (We actually had to get a bigger bed as he tends to jump in ours and slowly push us to the edges so that he can stretch out)! I post a lot of pictures of our Don Pedro on Facebook and Instagram, etc, because he is so photogenic and adorable to us at least.

We have been on the front page of the news twice, including even winning a Lookalike Competition! And now that we have recently moved to Victoria, he is constantly being photographed by the massive array of tourists. Yes I realize that his breed don’t live forever, and we hope that he will be with us for many more years of sheer joy, we know that he will leave us one day, where I will have to carry on as best I can, but for now I will enjoy everything that he has to offer. I thoroughly recommend an OES for anyone housebound and in constant pain as am I.

 

 

DonPedro2

Julie and Don Pedro enjoying the snow

I can’t wait to meet Don Pedro as Julie and I are friends in real life and she just moved to my town of Victoria, BC!

And finally, there’s my pet, Dorie. What can I say about my sweet kitty? We’ve had her for 9 years now, since she was a kitten and she is definitely MY cat.

BabyDorie

Dorie at 10 weeks old

She plays with Ray but she cuddles with me and I’m the one she curls up to at night when it’s bedtime. She sleeps tucked right up beside my tummy, as tight as she can and only moves when I need to get up to pee. She waits for me to come back and get comfy and then *boom* she’s right back in there again!

PamDorieBed

She seems to instinctively know when I’m having a bad day too. She loves to come curl up in my lap on those days, offering me comfort. On other days, when I’m blogging or otherwise occupied on the computer, she’ll stay close enough to wait to an opportunity to sneak onto my lap whenever she can!

Dorie2Oct2016

Just waiting for her moment!

Dorie has two special toys that she considers her babies – a blue crocheted string and a small stuffed bunny. She carries Bunny and String around the house, chirping at them and leaving them in the strangest places. We’ve found them in the food bowl before, and I once found Bunny in the recycling bin and the bathtub! Our rule is that we never move them unless absolutely necessary.

BunnyAndBSODinHelmet3

Bunny and String

Here I’d only set my motorcycle helmet down for a short while but apparently it was a good home for both toys! Dorie makes me laugh with her antics and I think that’s one of the best things a pet can do for you when you live with chronic pain – laugh!

Do you have a pet that helps you feel better? Tell me about it in the comments below and if you’d like to be featured in a post like this in the future, send me your information in the Contact Me form and I’ll be in touch!

Thanks for reading!

There is always hope!

Explaining Exhaustion & Pain

Welcome!

Have you ever felt tired? So tired you could barely move?  Guess what…I have a new word for you!!!

Actually, I think there are many people in my life who this word could apply to…the warriors who struggle along every day despite the illnesses that try to hold them back. My friends and fellow Warriors…you are simply Quanked!!!!!!

Taken from Grandiloquent Words:
Quanked
(KWANK’d)
Adjective:
-Overpowered by fatigue.
-To have the strength reduced or exhausted, as by labour or exertion; become fatigued; be sleepy.Origin uncertainUsed in a sentence:
“After sprunting all weekend, then frooncing to get my chores done, I’m well quanked.”Quanked is a condition in which one’s energy and vitality has been consumed. One who is quanked has used up his or her bodily or mental resources, usually because of arduous or long-sustained effort. To feel quanked at the end of the day; quanked after a hard run; feeling rather quanked; quanked by a long vigil.-See forswunke
Now, in all seriousness, I think the word is an excellent one to describe how it feels to be exhausted when you live with an Invisible Illness. It’s beyond any type of tiredness you’ve ever felt before. It’s sleeping for 12 hours and waking up just as tired as you were before you fell asleep. It’s like climbing a mountain when all you did was go up one flight of stairs. When sleeping on the couch is easier than trying to get up to go to bed.
Now add in being in pain constantly and what do you get? You get you. You get me. You get people like us, who have been living in varying stages of agony for varying periods of time.  I’ve talked with several friends who live with Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Chronic Fatigue plus various other Invisible Illnesses and they’ve described their fatigue and pain like this:
  • It’s like swimming through concrete while being on fire at the same time (this was mine).
  • It’s like constantly having a “pins and needles” sensation that never goes away
  • I feel like I’m being randomly stabbed by a crazed maniac, but that crazed maniac is inside my body and I can’t stop it.
  • There are parts of my body that are numb and parts of my body that are burning and other parts of my body are throbbing and it all happens at the same time.
  • My brain is foggy and I can’t remember things like I used to. I hurt everywhere all the time and I’m always tired, no matter how much sleep I get. I don’t like this me that I am anymore.
  • I feel like I’ve been in a war, but you can’t see my wounds
  • Do you remember when you were young and you could stay up for hours and hours at night and never feel old? Yeah, well I can’t do that anymore. I’m lucky if I can stay up past 7pm and I don’t even have kids. I’m too tired and achy and sore.

There are ways you can try to improve your sleep with Fibro and Chronic Pain and the key is consistency:

  1. Sleep in a quiet dark room with a slightly cooler temperature than normal. Wear a sleep mask if necessary.
  2. Power down the electronics (TV, computer, Smartphone, etc.)  one hour before bedtime. The light from your bedside clock is also enough to disrupt your sleep, so check and see if there is a dim light setting, or face the clock away from you at night.
  3. Set a regular bedtime and wake up time. Establishing a schedule can help the body recognize good sleep habits.
  4. Consider downloading and listening to “sleep music”. There are many recordings that are free, including delta wave music which works with your brainwaves to help lull you into a natural sleep. A “white noise” machine may do the trick for you. These can be found in almost any electronics store and come with various sounds and settings, designed to help your body relax and let go.
  5. Limit Alcohol before bed.  You know you’ve read this before but for good reason. Alcohol may make you “feel” tired but actually will wake you up more often.
  6. Eat a healthy snack 45 minutes before bed. This would be something with protein in it like half a turkey sandwich, a small bowl of whole-grain low-sugar cereal, milk or yogurt or a banana. Eating like this before bed helps stave off the “midnight munchies” where you wake up starving in the wee hours of the night.
  7. Get some exercise! Regular exercise like walking or swimming can help the body to rest well in the evening. Start slow and build up over time. Work with a personal trainer if possible who can help you set up a routine tailored to your specific needs and abilities.
  8. Check with your Doctor to ensure there are no other underlying health issues that could be causing your fatigue (i.e.: thyroid issues, anemia, etc.).
  9. Don’t just lay there – get up! If you haven’t been able to fall asleep within 20 minutes, get up and leave the bedroom. Read or do something that doesn’t involve your TV or computer/Smartphone until you feel sleepy and then try again. The bedroom should be for sleep and sex only. The longer you lay awake in bed for, the more used to being awake in bed your body becomes. You need to break that cycle so getting out of bed and moving to a different room is the smart choice.
  10. Medications should be the last resort but are available to help if needed. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist for information about over the counter medications to try first.

If you tend to be a worrier at night, with a million things running through your head, allow yourself 10 minutes of this. Set an alarm and let your thoughts go wild. At the end of those 10 minutes, it’s time to stop. It takes practice but it gives you the opportunity to get all those worries out without mulling them over for hours. This isn’t the time for solutions, just the time to acknowledge that they’re there. At the end, say something like “I’m glad I had this time to worry about everything, but now I’m going to sleep on them. I’ll deal with them in the morning”. It tells your brain you’ve acknowledged the worries, and you’ll do something about them later. And off to sleep you go.

Another way to sleep better at night is to be organized during the day. The less you leave to chance during the daytime, the less you need to stress at night. “Did I sign Johnny’s papers for camp?”  “Where did I put the chequebook?” “When is the next Book Club meeting?”  Whether you use your smartphone, an organizer or the calendar at home, by having a regular system for keeping track of appointments, meetings and paperwork, you’ll stress less knowing you have it all in one place and you’ll sleep better at night.

Sleeping better isn’t always about being in less pain. It’s about doing all the things you can to make your environment as sleep-conducive as possible which may result in less pain. Removing as much stress as possible from your sleeping area is one of the biggest and best things you can do, so try and think of all the things that will make your bedroom area the most comfortable it can be. Perhaps there are items from this post that will help, such as pillows or a special scent. The key is, whatever you do, do it with consistency. None of us wants to feel quanked.

Remember…there is always hope

Something Different…

And now for something completely different!

Every now and then, I like to put something on this blog that is seemingly unrelated to Chronic Pain, Fibromyalgia and/or Invisible Health. I like to change it up a little as you might remember from Fun and Games.

Today, I’m sharing something that again has been floating around the Internet forever. I’ve changed it to encompass my Children, not just my daughter as the original version goes. I’m proud of both of my kids. They’ve each gone through some difficult circumstances in their lives and come out the other side better people. I’d like to think that advice like this might account for some of it.

Here we go:

❤️❤️❤️❤️  RULES TO TEACH MY CHILDREN ❤️❤️❤️❤️

1. Make your bed every day, even if it’s right before you get in it.

2. You don’t have to wear underwear… if you’re in an accident they’ll just cut your clothes off anyway.

3. Travel light through life. Keep only what you need.

4. It’s okay to cry when you’re hurt. It’s also okay to smash (some) things; but, wash your face, clean your mess, and get up off the floor when you’re done. You don’t belong down there.

5. If you’re going to curse, be clever. If you’re going to curse in public, know your audience.

6. Seek out the people and places that resonate with your soul.

7. Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.

8. 5-second rule. It’s just dirt. There are worse things in a fast food cheeseburger.

9. You are a woman, you do not NEED a man. Or Vice Versa

10. Happiness is not a permanent state. Wholeness is. Don’t confuse these.

11. If you’re staying more than one night, unpack your bag.

12. Never lose your fierce spirit.

13. Be less sugar, more spice, and only as nice as you’re able to without compromising yourself.

14. Can’t is a cop-out.

15. Hold your heroes to a high standard. Then, be your own hero.

16. If you can’t smile with your eyes, don’t smile. Insincerity is nothing to aspire to.

17. Never lie to yourself.

18. HER – your body, your rules. HIM – re-read that.

19. If you have an opinion, you better know why.

20. Practice your passions.

21. Ask for what you want. The worst thing they can say is no.

22. Wish on stars and dandelions, then get to work to make them happen.

23. Stay as sweet as you are.

24. Fall in love often. Particularly with ideas, art, music, literature, food and far-off places.

25. Fall hard and forever in love with nothing but yourself.

26. Say Please, Thank You, and Pardon Me, whenever the situation warrants it.

27. Reserve “I’m sorry” for when you truly are.

28. Naps are for grown-ups, too.

29. Question everything, except your own intuition.

30. You have enough. You are enough.

31. You are amazing! Don’t let anyone ever make you feel you are not. If someone does….walk away. You deserve better.

32. No matter where you are, you can always come home.

33. Be happy and remember your roots; family is EVERYTHING.

34. Say what you mean and mean what you say.

35. No one will ever love you more than I do.

36. Be kind; treat others how you would like them to treat you.

37. If in doubt, remember whose Daughter/Son you are and straighten your crown, and own it like a boss!

Share your thoughts in the comments…is this advice you would give to your children? What is the best advice you have given to them? What was the best advice you ever received from your parents, or the people who raised you?

Do you think any of these pieces of advice DO relate to having an Invisible Illness? If so, which one(s)?

The reason I ask is that I think ALL of these questions could apply to someone with Chronic Pain. For example, #1 – isn’t it nicer to sleep in a bed that’s fresh and cool and made, with the sheets and blankets “just so”? And #6 – we all know that stress increases our pain levels, so by seeking out people and places that resonate with our souls, we are filling ourselves with the kind of peace that can end up helping us heal.

Let’s look at #14 – Can’t is a cop-out. I’m sure we’ve all said we “can’t” do something. Is that really true, or are we saying we can’t because it’s too painful or too overwhelming? Well, can we try something different then, or break the task into smaller pieces? Can we ask for help? Are we automatically saying the word we can’t, without even trying first? Sometimes we do the “kneejerk” reaction, without even stopping to think if something is possible. If we give it a try we might come to realize that not only is it possible, it’s actually quite enjoyable and beneficial at the same time.

For #25, Fall hard and forever in love with nothing but yourself – well, that seems a little narcissistic but if you don’t love yourself first, can you be capable of loving anything else? I believe there has to be a level of self-love in a person in order for them to love other people. You have to know what love is, in order to give love away. And I truly believe that love is for giving away to others!!

And for #37 – well, I think that says a lot too. On your highest pain days, when all seems lost and you don’t think you can go on, sometimes you’re going to have to remember your roots, straighten your crown and own your life like a BOSS! No one knows you better than you and these are the times you have to pamper yourself like never before. Pull out all the stops on your comfort item list and do whatever it takes to feel better.

Go through the list above and see if you make Chronic Pain and Invisible Illness positives from the rest of the numbers. I was able to and even if you’re not a naturally positive person, I think it can be done.

Remember…

There is always hope!

Chronic Pain Comforts

Welcome back!

When you live with Chronic Pain, whether it’s from Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis, Migraines or any other Invisible Illness, you want to find as many ways to be as comfortable as possible. You may or may not be taking pain medications, so sometimes the things on this list are the only things you rely on to get relief. You can find lists like these all over the internet, but I’m going to share my favourite ideas here. I won’t give you product names as there are far too many to mention and everyone has their favourite brands. I don’t tend to use all of these products myself, but many people do. If it works for you, great! If it doesn’t, don’t worry about it…move on and try something else.

Some of these things are for use at home, some are for taking with you when you’re out and some can be used in both locations. I like to have doubles of things such as Wet Wipes. They’re refreshing on the go or at home when bathing is a challenge and you need a quick clean up.

In no particular order:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Heating Pad: Many people find using a source of heat to be extremely comforting. Just remember to take safety precautions with your skin, and never use a deep heating rub with a heating pad at the same time, or you’re asking to be burned.

Ice Packs: In much the same way as using heat, ice packs can be a lifesaver for pain. Some people with chronic pain use both at the same time…heat in one area and ice in another. Experiment with what works for you.

Eye Mask: When you’re having trouble sleeping, this can be quite soothing, especially if you prefer to sleep in complete darkness. It’s also helpful for Fibro induced migraines.

Ear Plugs: Again, super helpful to block out distractions to help you sleep better and to aid when Fibro migraines strike.

Epsom Salts: Soaking in a hot Epsom Salt bath is one of the best things you can do to soothe aching joints and muscles. There has been an explosion in Flotation Therapy lately in cities all over North America. People spend up to 90 minutes at a time in skin temperature Epsom Salt flotation therapy tanks, literally soaking up the benefits of this mineral. The ratio of Epsom salt to water in most tanks is such that many are more buoyant than the Dead Sea!

Magnesium Rub or Gel: Another essential mineral needed by the body, most of us are deficient. Using a good rub or gel can help alleviate pain. Ask your doctor if a supplement of Magnesium is right for you as well.

Pillows: Pillows for sleeping, pillows for propping, pillows for wedging, body pillows…wherever you need some extra support, finding the right pillow can be crucial to your comfort. Firm, medium or soft; feather or foam, whatever your preference is, you’re going for comfort, so let your body be the guide here.

Shower chair: If bathing is uncomfortable for you, but showing tires you out, consider getting a shower chair. They come in many sizes and shapes and can be found in lightweight, portable designs.

Kindle or e-reader: Take your entertainment with you or leave it at home, but always have your favourite books at your fingertips with an e-reader. There are many services that let you download books for free including your local library.

Body Lotion: Your favourite scent can help keep you smiling.

Magic bag/wheat pillow: These are the type of bag you can either microwave or freeze and use for spots on your body for various aches and pains

Scented candle: Some people find having scented candles burning helps them to relax. Try different scents according to the seasons or just choose your favourites.

Mints or Gum: If you tend towards having a dry mouth, you might want to keep mints or gum handy, or hard candies to suck on. I personally like Tic Tacs as they are small, come in lots of assorted flavours and are easy to pack in even the smallest of purses.

Colouring book: Currently one of the fastest growing trends to help relax you, there is an endless array of styles and designs to choose from. I have several on the go at any time, and use both pencil crayons and felt markers to colour mine. Jenny Lawson’s last book is part story/part colouring epic.

Herbal Tea: Even if you’re not normally a tea drinker, a good herbal tea at night (decaffeinated of course) can be a wonderful way to unwind before falling asleep. Many delicious flavours are there to choose from; I personally like fruity flavours the best.

Water to stay hydrated: Whether you use a water bottle or fancy decanter, having cold fresh water is essential in maintaining optimal good health for any condition. Make sure you keep it fresh by changing drinking the contents often.

Chocolate: Definitely an indulgence but if you’re not a fan of chocolate, at least keep a favourite snack nearby as a treat.

Fan: A small portable fan or a hand fan can help if you have trouble regulating your body temperature.

TENS Machine: Many people swear that using a TENS Machine helps with pain. I personally haven’t found relief with one, but everyone is different. Find out if you can rent one through a Medical Supply Store first before buying a unit, so you know if it will help you or not.

Portable Cane: A foldable cane can be super handy for around the house or outside if you find that sometimes you’re unsteady on your feet. They come in various colours and patterns so you won’t be stuck with “just” basic black if you want something to stand out with.

Essential Oils: These oils have long been thought to have medicinal purposes and many people swear by their properties. There are several good companies that market these and many more little independent companies to check out. Some carry a full range of products designed to use as a set and some carry individual offerings. Find what works for you.

Wet Wipes: The portable bath! When you need to freshen up but you’re just not feeling well enough for a proper bath or shower, wet wipes are the miracle bath.

Dry Shampoo: Like the above, dry shampoo is a spray/shake in, brush out helper for clean fresh hair without having to go through the full and proper wash and dry.

Favourite Pet or Stuffie: Everyone needs someone to cuddle!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So there you have it, my list of essential comfort items when you need a little pick me up. Are there things you can think of that you would use? Share them in the comments so we can add them to our own lists.

Thanks for reading and remember…

there is always hope